Home
Videos uploaded by user “1000 Londoners”
The woman keeping traditional London alive through a Pie & Mash shop: Jacqueline, Londoner #161
 
03:07
It’s hard to find a more typical, traditional ‘London’ meal than Pie and Mash. Jacqueline and her family run the beautifully preserved, art deco, Manze’s Pie and Mash shop in Walthamstow. This is a shop with a long tradition and to Jacqueline it represents her passion for keeping traditional London alive and keeping the community together. And nothing can bring people together like Pie and Mash. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: The shop is based in Walthamstow Market, E17. There was a lady that carried on after Mr and Mrs Manze named Millie and then my father took over from her and she retired. Now obviously it's changed and then the area went very down. But I think from what I hear, and from the last year it's got a lot better and things have started to pick up. Well I think the shop has a strong place in the community simply because one it has a passion to the people in this area because they love pie and mash and also because of the the interior of it, because it's all traditional and it's original and everything. Once you know it was just a pie shop and now we get all walks of life coming into the shop. Since I can remember back I think London's changing all the time. You know, you have different cultures coming and going. They come into London and then they move away and it's changing all the time. My feeling about the area and buildings changing - I feel quite strongly about that actually. Mainly because of the shop and because of what it means to me. You'd be stupid to change anything that's like this because there's not many places in London that have been kept. There's lots of buildings have been pulled down and could have been restored and would add character to the area. Anything I could possibly do to to help the area or help the shop I will.
Views: 55897 1000 Londoners
Creating period costumes, from Harry Potter to Sweeney Todd: Jackie, Londoner #99
 
03:01
Jackie is a highly skilled historical costume maker based at Sands Films, Rotherhithe. Described as a ‘hidden treasure’, Sands Films is a period costume facility, based in a Grade 2 listed granary building located metres away from the Thames. The company has created costumes for countless film, TV, stage and opera productions, including Sweeney Todd, Les Miserables and Harry Potter. One of three generations to work at Sands Films, Jackie followed in her mother’s footsteps 20 years ago, helping with the ironing and washing of costumes. Since then she has worked on every part of the costume process, from sewing and embroidering, to dying fabrics, washing and ironing. Her daughter works alongside her, and her granddaughter of just 8 has recently been bought a sewing machine. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. 1000londoners.com youtube.com/1000londoners facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit chocolatefilms.com Transcript: This dress that I'm getting ready at the moment is for a hot drinks commercial, looking at costumes through the years and how costumes have changed. When I first came here it was all derelict, there was no Surrey Quays, there was no houses, it was just all corrugated iron everywhere, just the Thames and the old docks. And then they regenerated the area, built the houses up, so there's been a tremendous change. I like things to stay as they are. But this little part where we actually work has not been changed that much. I like that. Sands Films is a costume warehouse, we make costumes for films, theatres. We're actually located about a hundred yards from the river. We are a little hidden treasure. All the costumes here are made as accurate as we can from the original. It goes right to the underwear with that authentic. They wouldn't have a pair of modern underwear on underneath, you know, they would have crotchless bloomers on and you know, it would be as authentic as we could make it. We have original costumes which we take apart, to see how they're assembled, no machining unless it's past the period in time, you know. We don't use zips or velcro, that's a taboo word! She wouldn't be very wealthy person who wore this dress, she'd probably be some poor cow that works in a factory. Sorry! As a youngster I used to get very excited, but now if you see your work on the screen you think - got to make sure my hems OK, the sleeves are in right, you know, and also that the actual dresser has put them into the costume correctly in the first place, because the girls have to be really squeezed into that corset. When I was a little girl I did not have any ambition whatsoever. My mum used to work here and I used to come and visit her, and I fell in love with the place and it's just sort of snowballed from there. Now we're on the third generation - my daughter works here. So we're just trying to train up the granddaughter now. We've worked with hundreds, I mean we've been on all the big films from Sweeney Todd, Cinderella, I mean they go on and on, Harry Potter! But my claim to fame I must say is getting told off by Christopher Lee for having my shoelaces undone running around the building. The atmosphere in this place is, - you couldn't get it anywhere else. It's just an amazing building. We're quite unique here.
Views: 15399 1000 Londoners
Ben Aaronovitch, the writer of the "Rivers of London" supernatural crime novels, Londoner #76
 
03:10
Ben Aaronovitch is the acclaimed author of the supernatural police procedural "Rivers of London" series. It wasn't always plain sailing for him though. After some success early in his career which saw him script episodes of Doctor Who and Casualty he was soon forced to take a job at Waterstones in Covent Garden as the writing work dried up. It was here though that he decided to take matters into his own hands and began writing his own novels. We joined him back in Covent Garden as he revisited his old work place and took part in April 2015's City Read event. Transcript: This is the Covent Garden brach of Waterstones incase you haven't had an establishing picture at the beginning of the interview. This is my Waterstones that I worked in, when I was poor. And just round the corner is the Science fiction section where I came up with the idea for Rivers of London. The idea was "Oh God, please let me write a book so I can make some money". The first book is mostly set around Covent Garden. I essentially set it within walking distance of where I worked so on lunch hours I could go out look at the buildings and I could work out where the chases were and everything like that. And the story took me to burning down Covent Garden which was hilarious. Sometimes you have to go to the places that the story says that you're going to go to You can't fight the story. And it's quite fun because now I imagine that the Genius Bar were established in the rebuilding phase after it was burned down. That's why all the shops were changed and everything. Cityread is like another one which has attempted to get people to go to their libraries and read books which is, I think, a very laudable thing. Libraries are very very important and we will really really miss them if we lose them. Me and Ben Bailey Smith, otherwise known as Doc Brown are going to cluster round with a real Mark II Jaguar and give away copies of my books because my publisher feels that it's a year without sunshine if they haven't given away one of my books for free. From Ben to Josh. For some reason when you're a Londoner, they always ask you, 'Why do you write about London?', like you should possibly, despite the fact that you grew up there and know loads about London and nothing about Birmingham, set your books in Birmingham instead. People don't really believe in native born Londoners. If you look at all the great London novels, a lot of have been written by non-Londoners. And they tend to think of Londoners like single aspect. It's like this big film screen upon which they project their hopes and fears and nightmares. Whereas if you're a Londoner it's actually where you live, it's where you're from. And that's a slightly different relationship. If you're a Londoner, London is your home town so it's not like somewhere you went because it's exciting and to further your career, it's where your first film, it's where your cinema was, where your home and relatives were from, where your relatives live now, where your first kiss, your first school, all of these things - it's got that kind of network. It is your small town, it's just a big, small town. It just never occurred to me not to write in London. Not because I'm massively London-centric, media Hampstead type but because I'm a Londoner and can sing the second verse of 'Maybe It's Because I'm a Londoner'.
Views: 11299 1000 Londoners
Victoria is 7 years old and loves horse riding - Londoner #243
 
02:33
Victoria is 7 years old and loves horse riding. When she's riding her pony Bobby, she feels like she doesn't have to worry about anything and that he will take care of her. Victoria would like to go on and compete in pony shows. This Film was made on a Chocolate Films Workshop with 6th form students at Graveney School, Tooting in partnership with Wimbledon Bookfest funded by the Wimbledon Foundation. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a ten-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter @1000_Londoners Instagram @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com TRANSCRIPT When I ride I feel that I don't have to worry about anything and that Bobby will take care of me when I'm riding him and that it's absolutely fine. I feel really relaxed and happy. The name of my horse is Bobby Dassler. He's really, really cheeky, but also really funny when he's being cheeky and that he's sensible when he has to be. And it's not that I'm teaching him what to do, he's teaching me what to do. If I had to describe my pony in 1 word it would be indescribable. I go horse riding 3 times in the week when it's school, but in the summer holidays I try to go every single day. I groom him, I fill up his water, I muck out his stable, I do everything that you have to do to take care of a horse. The age that I started horse riding was about 2 years old, but I didn't do like proper horse riding, mummy just sat me on a Shetland pony and it just took me for a walk around. I've fallen off Bobby three times, I felt a bit nervous at the time, but after, uhm, after a couple of days I knew that it was fine, so I just got back on and I, I was a bit nervous but not that much. My favourite memory is when I had a water bottle and I put it at the top, at the top of his mouth and, and and then he, and then I squirted it and he made funny faces. I'd really like to do some shows in the future, because I quite like competing and with Bobby's previous owner he was in Show Pony of the Year and I really want to compete 'cause I like competing. I absolutely love horses. I love about horses that if you've had a really hard day, when you go with'em you don't remember all the things that you've had a hard day about. You just be with them and you forget all about it and that's really nice.
Views: 95853 1000 Londoners
Joel Bennett, trials cycling in London's secret extreme sports playgrounds - Londoner #18
 
03:07
Joel Bennett is a leading exponent of trials riding, a subcategory of biking in which riders negotiate courses of their own design along impossibly narrow beams or leap chasm-like gaps. Without your feet touching the ground. The idea is to reclaim urban spaces by using the architecture as fuel for creativity and skill, like parkour on wheels. Highly in demand for his trials riding, breakdancing and parkour, Joel is passionate about his unique perspective on our ignored corners. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: So you've got trials riders and then I hang around with some people that do parkour and whenever you're with those people, BMX as well, they just look at the city in such a different way. The Heygate Estate is my favourite place in London. I guess the way I see this is very different to the way someone else might see it, so that they might feel fear or they may just be apathetic, but for me there's a connection. It's like a, I guess like a child in a playground. You're looking at what you're about to do and you know you can do it but your mind's telling you, this is kind of a weird thing to do. I could be on a bus or I could be going past a spot or on the train and I just, I see this spot and I just, it all goes slow motion and I see myself jumping in the air with some really kind of slow violin type music, it's all slow-motion, it's just beautiful, ah it's all flowing. You know, it's this kind of architecture that you really think wow, this is what I can connect with in London.
Views: 25031 1000 Londoners
Glen Ellis, the Londoner who opens and closes Tower Bridge - Londoner #29
 
03:13
Glen is a mechanical engineer by training, and now works in the control cabin at one of London's most iconic Landmarks, Tower Bridge. It is Glen's job to raise and lower the bridge several times a day to allow shipping to pass underneath. A self-pronounced problem-solver, Glen is inspired by his unique workplace and his central role in one of London's most photographed daily rituals. This is film is the first in the Londoners of the Thames - 1000 Londoners Totally Thames 2014 series. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript Hi, good afternoon Gann. Tower Bridge Radio.Yeah, just calling to let you know we’re standing by for your 15:15 bridge lift. Checking up shortly. All understood, we’ll stand by for your departure. Over. It was back in 1997. I was doing a bridge lift at about 10 o’clock at night, and all of a sudden we saw blue flashing lights all over the place and it turned out to be Bill Clinton, stuck at the gates in his limousine. And well, within a few minutes of him stopping the phone went. We had Scotland Yard on the phone saying “Put the bridge down.” You know, the president is stuck at the gates and unfortunately I had to tell them I can’t do that because I had a boat coming under the bridge and I can’t jeopardise a vessel. South-East all clear, thank you. When the bridge was built it was in the middle of the busiest docks in the world and the act of parliament that was passed at the time did decree that shipping have right of way over road traffic and that still stands to this day. I would like to think I’m a bit of a problem solver. If I’ve got a fridge or a freezer that packs up working, or central heating, I’ll always have a bash at that before calling out the experts shall we say. If we’ve got any issues on the bridge where we need to get a situation sorted out, you know, I’ll stick at it until I can solve the problems. A lot of people don’t realise it still opens and funnily enough the ones that don’t are probably you know, quite a lot of Londoners. Waterloo all clear, roger Well the bridge is going to be opening in, is scheduled to open at 3.15 so that’s 15 minutes time. Tango two, tango two. Mike four. Thanks for calling me Jim. I’m just in the process of starting our pumps up here. As soon as they’ve started I’ll proceed with the life for you over. So we’ve got eight pumps to start and they all start in sequence so they don’t overload the system. And when we’re happy the boats ready to come through we’ll stop the road traffic. Stand by bridge staff, about to stop road traffic. Clear the centre of bridge, the bridge is about to open. Clear the bridge please. Then we get to the point where we can pull the lever which turns the gears of course and opens the bridge. Obviously working on one of the most unique sights, icons in the world, erm it’s recognisable all over the place, Tower Bridge and I feel honoured. And there she goes. It’s a unique job and I don’t think there’s any other job quite like it to be honest yeah.
Views: 20633 1000 Londoners
Who's keeping Britain's oldest brewery alive? - John Hatch, Londoner #62
 
03:37
John is a passionate connoisseur of beer and brewing. From a very young age he worked for the award-winning Young’s which brewed its beer at The Ram, the oldest brewery in the country with records going back to 1533. In 2006, Youngs announced that they had sold the site to property developers. John was stunned that this crucial part of British brewing history was going to be lost, and offered to keep the brewery going on a smaller scale. In the nine years since, he has brewed one batch of beer every week on a non-commercial basis to keep the records going until the site is redeveloped with a new micro-brewery. John is still brewing in his makeshift brewery, where donations from visitors keep the beer flowing. As the site has been used regularly as a filming location, guests to the brewery have included the cast and crew of Misfits, Ashes to Ashes, Silent Witness and Cockneys Versus Zombies. He also holds regular comedy nights in his sample room. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: Well this was Britain’s oldest brewery. Brewing continuously, we know, since at least 1533 and I thought that was heritage well worth maintaining. But I don’t expect everyone else to agree with me. But it’s nice when they do, it’s lovely. 2006, Youngs chose the day of my birthday to announce they were going to shut later that year. So it wasn’t a great birthday to be perfectly honest. Now it’s just a case of stirring it in. Most breweries have got a very technical mechanical way of doing it. I’ve just got a big stick. Youngs sold the brewery to Minerva and I spoke to Minerva pretty early on actually because I wanted to try and save the brewery. And I said, well, we can brew once a week as token gesture, maintain the records and that way you still have Britain's oldest brewery. So these are details of all the materials I've used so far, I think Youngs have got the same format going back until at least I think 1910 or something. I then transfer all this information into an old leather- bound ledger with details of all the brews we've ever done here really - it just helps with tradition, and it's just, it's got a nice feel to it - I don't know why I like it so much. To be perfectly honest you would never design a brewery like this, I mean it works, it makes beer but it is pretty haphazard, but it was just thrown together. This was part of the old tea urn from the canteen with a bit of welding and few things added on to it, lots of insulation. I am actually quite proud of this, I really am, it's got a part of me in it. Right, ok. Almost every week I face a new challenge I'm always dreaming of the day I can have a nice easy brewery which doesn't need me running about with a spanner every 5 minutes. Unfortunately we've got a bit of a veto situation on commercial brewing at the moment so we can't sell any beer. First couple of months there were a few of us basically putting hands into our own pockets and buying the molten hops and after a while of course that became jolly expensive. One of the guys had this brilliant idea of putting an honesty box in the sample room- and he said people could put money into it, and he said we're not forcing them to - we're not selling the beer as such. But we are lucky with the comedy nights so I owe a great deal to the comedians just to fund me. The Ram brewery is being really developed into a nice town centre and the micro brewery itself will move into what I call the porter tun room - porter being an old style London beer so it's rather a good place for it to be really. So I've gone from 5000 barrels a week maximum to a half barrel a week maximum, but it's still brewing which I'm delighted by. Click the videos to watch more Londoners and don't forget to subscribe.
Views: 12735 1000 Londoners
Moira Cameron, the first female Beefeater / Yeoman Warder at the Tower of London - Londoner #19
 
03:13
In 2007, after 22 years of service in Her Majesty's Armed Forces, Moira Cameron became the first female Yeomen Warder in over 500 years of the institution's history. Whilst her roles include guarding the Crown Jewels it is clear that Moira's true passion is the Tower community itself; from the families that live within it's walls to the joy of guiding tourists around as they discover this significant part of London. Having never served in London before this posting, Moira had always dreamed of a position in the capital. Yet it wasn't until she saw a listing in The Soldier magazine that the thought of working within the Tower occurred to her as a possibility. Her full title is now "Yeoman Warder of Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress the Tower of London, and Members of the Sovereign's Body Guard of the Yeoman Guard in the Extraordinary" and she is a London landmark in her own right. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: I'm a Yeoman Warder or Beefeater at the Tower of London. We look after it and we look after the daily prisoners as we like to call them. We're all retired military personnel. We've done a minimum of 22 years in Her Majesties Armed Forces in the army, the navy or the airforce. We have to have our long service and good conduct medal, that one there. And we also have to be the rank of a Warrant Officer class 2, and then we can apply for the job. So it's 22 years build up to just applying for this job. I am the only female Beefeater at the Tower of London, I was also the first one. This is one that I use, when I'm doing my talks, I'm not the only bird at the Tower. It wasn't until my last year that there was an article in The Soldier magazine and it said that it wasn't just a job for the boys. So I applied for it, 'cause I just thought it was a really interesting job. Thank you very much. I never had a posting in London. I always tried, 'cause London was one of the places that everybody wanted to go. So this was my final posting. I've got a place to live and work. We look after the security on the ground. Because we have about 45 families that live at the Tower, we have to make sure that people don't go wondering into other people's houses. We make sure that, you know, people are respecting the tower as well, 'cause it is still a Royal Palace. You get a real sense of security in here, which is something that I've been used to for the last 26 years now. Everybody knows each other and it's like a village mentality really, you know. People can walk out and leave the doors unlocked, knowing that nobody's going to go in. A child that was interviewed here one time said 'I don't just have one set of parents, I have...' at the time I think it was 40. So this is the tunic for my state uniform and on the front we still have the EII2. To be able to work at The Tower of London and wear this uniform. It's an iconic site. We're an iconic site, we're a tourist attraction in our own right. It's the sense of pride that you get to continue to be able to serve Her Majesty as well. After 22 years loyal service, you carry it on here as well so there's a real good, warm feeling about the whole situation.
Views: 24580 1000 Londoners
Tim King, who has documented his entire year though reportage illustration - Londoner #59
 
03:08
Tim is a designer and illustrator who set himself the challenge of documenting 2014 through reportage. Reportage is an art that captures real events and situations through drawings, and dates back to the 1800s when 'special artists' would go out on to the front lines just as photo journalists do now. How has the project made this year any different? "I remember everything...perfectly." 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: At the minute I'm doing a project where I'm documenting an entire year through reportage illustration. Essentially, reportage is...it's about storytelling. Back in...I think it was about 1842 when illustration on London News started and there was a lot of wars happening at the time and photography wasn't quite good enough then to capture any kind of movement so they used to use these guys called 'special artists' who used to go out onto the front lines and experience everything that the soldier experienced. I think most of the time, if you're out in the public, people don't really notice. If you try and hide it, people will come over and see what you're doing but if you just go for it then most people don't ever realise. It's weird. I quite like busy situations where there's lots going on. Like things happening in the foreground, lots happening in the background. So I think you've just got to get up close and get involved in the situation. If someone realises I'm doing them they usually smile and be quite happy about it. Sometimes they'll come over and have a look and they really like it. It's made the year go super quickly. Like I could look back at a drawing now from the start of the year and I can kind of remember the whole day, things that were going on around me at that time. And I guess it's because, when you're drawing you're kind of using every sense a lot more. This year's been a lot more interesting. I couldn't remember half the things I did last year but I can remember all the thing's I've done this year...perfectly.
Views: 6992 1000 Londoners
Alexandra Burke - the new West End star taking the stage in The Bodyguard musical - Londoner #21
 
03:14
ALEXANDRA, THE NEW WEST END STAR WHO'S LIVING HER DREAM, Londoner #21 In June 2014, Alexandra Burke took on her first stage role, as the star the hit musical, 'The Bodyguard', following in the footsteps of her idol Whitney Houston. Alexandra rose to fame after winning X-factor in 2008. She's since had international success, releasing two major studio albums and winning several awards for her music. But there is another passion of hers beyond singing that she has kept hidden for a long time - acting. This new short documentary follows Alexandra for a day - as she travels from talk shows to luxury hotels, and eventually takes the stage at the Adelphi Theatre. She is constantly accompanied throughout by a loyal team of managers and stylists making it hard not to notice similarities between the life of her character in 'The Bodyguard'. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: There you go darling I'm putting you next to Sharon Osborne Oh there you are. Love it! It's my second week in the Bodyguard the musical and Loose Women have kindly asked me to come in to talk about it and how I'm finding it. Is it alright if I talk through the topics? I have a lot of people around me that are very protective over me. My family my management protect me with both both eyes and eyes behind their head. So it's kind of hard to do anything that, to get past them really. Last night some people in the cast came up to me and went, "we're just trying to work this out." "Is he your man or Manager" I said you guys did not just ask me that. And I said, you're the reason why I'm single. Every guy that approaches me, looks at him and goes. Because he stands there and he's like what, you want to talk to my artist? I don't stand like that at all. But you've got the Tristan stance, the Bodyguard stance. Yes you have. So now I'm actually trying to find her a boyfriend. That's my mission. It's God that works in mysterious ways. For me to have to take in this kind of role as my first ever acting job and for me to be the biggest fan of Whitney Huston, it's crazy, in fact to how similar her story was to mine in my personal life. Please welcome Bodyguard Star Alexandra Burke. Singing is my love, absolutely music is my love. But acting is another l've of mine that I've hidden away for a very very long time. The transitions been actually very smooth and that's because I've worked so hard, when I knew that this was going to happen automatically I go on a strict diet. I'm now pretty boring, I do a show, I go home and I go to sleep. I wake up and I just repeat the same thing. This is a call to stand bye please for Miss Burke and all involved in Queen of the Night. You know I woke up this morning exhausted and I thought you know what, I'm not in the mood today. Mt Manager Garry tells me Dionne Warwick is coming tonight and I said you're lying and he said, yes she is. My energy lifted and simply because, she is a legend. She introduced me to her son tonight, David. Whitney Huston is a cousin of theirs so she's family. To have Dionne Warwick's blessings tonight. It just doesn't get any better than that. I have to be strict on my self, I can't let the ball drop. It's a sacrifice for three months and will hopefully lead to bigger and better things. Because where I want to go next, by God's grace, Hollywood.
Views: 29174 1000 Londoners
Captaining the Woolwich Ferry, the only free ferry service in London: David Watkins - Londoner #98
 
03:15
David is the Captain of the only free ferry service in London; the Woolwich Ferry. Despite making the same short journey, from the north to the south of the river thames and back again, he never gets bored as "no two journeys are the same". The camaraderie between his crew always provides entertainment, but also the tide, the cars, the people all differ on each journey, and from his viewpoint he gets to see everything. David is from a family of people who have worked on the Thames and although his Father's suffered a severe accident it hasn't put him or his son off continuing to work on the river. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. 1000londoners.com youtube.com/1000londoners facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit chocolatefilms.com Transcript: Everybody I meet says to me 'You must get bored, you must get absolutely bored going from North to South, South to North' I never get bored of it. No two trips are the same. I'm just easing the vessel into the terminal, nice and easy, trying not to bump along the side. The guys say we like to do it without cracking an egg. Some of us do it, some of us don't. I would have cracked a box full with that one! I play a lot of golf. I'm quite a sociable guy, and, when I'm out, if ever they see me they ask me what I do for a living. Everybody's interested in the job I'm doing, what I'm up to. Yeah, I love it. I'm very proud. You get to see all the vessels that go by, get to see some beautiful vessels. In the reach at the moment, we've got some tall ships - that's a rare sight. Obviously, looking down, I get to see all the cars, some nice cars that come on the vessel. Also you get some amorous couples. They don't think to look up and see me, you can look over some times and you might see a little bit of kissing and cuddling and canoodling, and that's quite funny sometimes. I've been a bit wicked in the past and if I see a couple having a little kiss and a cuddle I often get on the phone and call my crew mates, and tell them that the couple in a certain car need some advice and direction. It's a little bit wicked I know but I do enjoy doing that. My Dad worked on the tug, they were responsible for towing the rubbish out of London and the company he worked for put a modification on the tug which the crew of the tug, including my Dad, didn't want because they felt it was dangerous. They put a bar over the top of the towing hook. Well the day my Dad was on there, the rope slipped and it trapped my Dad's hand. Every bone in his hand it shattered. He broke his arm obviously and he was never the same after that. Part of the river where the accident happened is a place called Walbrook Dock. Every time I pass there I can't help looking over and thinking yeah that's where my dad's end of life really started, if I'm honest. I still miss him. People still talk about him. He was a bit of a character, my Dad. I like to think that I've got a bit of his sense of humour, bless him. There we are, I've cracked another egg, side egg!
Views: 20572 1000 Londoners
Owner of London's first custom tattoo shop, "Into You": Alex Binnie, Londoner #129
 
03:00
Alex became a tattoo artist in his teens in the late 70's following art school. He opened the first real custom tattoo shop in London: 'Into You' and has tattooed many celebrities. 23 years in the game, Alex shares with us his insight into the tattoo world. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. 1000londoners.com youtube.com/1000londoners facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit chocolatefilms.com Transcript: If I wasn't tattooing, what would I be doing? Well if I'd never, what I'd be doing now in my life is raising chickens probably. The great thing about tattooing is that you make art but you're not stuck with it, it's not all hanging around the house, it walks away from you. It's something that I've learnt to do, to focus and concentrate for that amount of time and it is tiring, it's very tiring. I mean I do quite a lot of other art work as well and I find that.. I think that my experience of tattooing and to be able to make myself sit down for three or four hours at a time and basically focus completely, has enabled me to do other work as well that requires that. You have to be pretty disciplined with tattooing. Now in modern contemporary culture, things are so complex . The kind of ways that money and power and information and what have you are exchanged and move around the world and it's a very complicated circle. Whereas tattooing to me seems so simple and straightforward. I tattoo you, you pay me. Or even better swap for goods. I love a swap, a good tattoo swap. Nothing like it. One of the more interesting swaps I've been doing recently is my darling wife had a terrible bike accident and had a brain injury and as it happens I tattoo a man that specialises in post brain injury treatment so I've been swapping tattoos with for post brain injury counselling. We are now in our 23rd year would you believe? We are just entering our 23rd year, which I realise is quite an achievement, so I'm quite proud. When we started this shop there was.. tattooing was a completely different social thing to what it is now. It was really quite underground and when we opened the shop it was quite a risky thing in a sense. Noone had really had a shop like this in London in terms of its scale and visibility. Most tattooing was still either very old school or underground so we tried to bring it out into the mainstream as it were and which we succeeded in and now there's many, many, many shops. And we may well only have one year left to run on the lease. We have only got one year left to run on the lease. So, I guess we'll move. I think that's the idea. Keep on the family name, keep on the tradition, erm, and move. Move businesses. After what almost 30 years in the game now I kind of done my talking about tattooing.
Views: 8293 1000 Londoners
Dick Smith, who custom builds 1950's & 60's Triumph motorbikes - Londoner #44
 
03:07
Dick, AKA The Baron, is a custom motorcycle designer and builder based in Croydon. His speciality is 1950s & 60s Triumphs, for which he has a lasting affinity, as well as other classic British bikes. Dick first rode on his brothers track bike aged four and has been obsessed with building and racing motorcycles ever since. His skill, knowledge and craftsmanship are legend in the world of classic custom bikes. This film is one of 5 that have been selected for our ‘Design in London’ open submission competition, launched back in May 2014. http://www.londondesignfestival.com/events/1000-londoners-design-london 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. 1000londoners.com youtube.com/1000londoners facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit chocolatefilms.com Transcription: There had always been bikes in the family, As a kid I was one of those, probably annoying kids When I got a toy or anything, I would pull it apart to see what it was going on. From an early age, it was a hobby, but it almost became an obsession, I suppose. It was just bikes and being free. That feeling of speed and freedom, You sort of, kind of feel as one, with something you've cerated and designed. You're just holding on and feeling everything and listening to every noise it's making. And just thinking about everything, the engine is doing, what the bits and pieces are doing. acceleration, adrenaline rush, it's just a really, really god feeling. When I design something, I'm going with my gut instinct, I know what I want at the end of the day and I wont stop until I've achieved it. A lot of the customers, that's what they like. Because it is hand built, it's not built by machine, we use machines to enable us to make parts but everything is pretty much hand made and hands on. We don't use any CAD or CNC stuff, everything is done in the traditional way. There's just something about the whole shape and the look of the bike. They've got real character But the speed thing is something else, they're not like modern bikes, it's a different kind of acceleration. And it's just a whole different feel. A completely different feel. I've been asked on more than one occasion, would I customise and I just turn round and say well, "no I won't" Because I stick with the Meriden stuff and the other British makes. That's what I know, that's what I love and I think if I was to change from that, what comes from in here and up there won't go into that because I haven't got the affection for that bike, like I have for these. This is where it stems from the love for these things that gives you the passion, that drives you to get what I consider the best that we do out of them. The future for these old bikes, I think it will carry on, Maybe if it will die off like it did before in the past, somebody else some young guys, girls will come along, pick up on it again, everything that goes around, comes around. Always has done, always will do.
Views: 20156 1000 Londoners
Gail Brodholt, who creates amazing linocut prints of London's transport - Londoner #40
 
03:00
Gail is a professional painter and printmaker of contemporary London landscapes. Much of her work depicts the London transport network and the journeys made across the city on tubes and trains. She works in her studio right by the Thames Barrier at Second Floor Studio and Arts in Woolwich. In this film we see Gail printing her linocuts, and we hear her talking about the inspiration for her work, which comes from the journeys made by ordinary Londoners and their everyday experiences. This film is one of 5 that have been selected for our ‘Design in London’ open submission competition, launched back in May 2014. londondesignfestival.com/events/1000-londoners-design-london 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. 1000londoners.com youtube.com/1000londoners facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit chocolatefilms.com Transcript: The print making process I use is mainly lino cuts. I print them on my albion press made in ’41 so over 170 years old now. I bought it on eBay years ago from some bloke in Norfolk and he delivered it to me just strapped upright to the back of his trailer. I don't know how it got here without mishap but it did and I've moved it myself...not myself but with the help of strong men and each time it's been safely moved. If it cracks, because it's cast-iron, well, it's done for so I take great care of it. I suppose what I'm interested in, is those noticed places that people pass through on their way to somewhere else, you know, on the tube escalator or railway station platform, speeding down the motorway. We're all so focussed on arriving somewhere that we hardly notice our surroundings as we're getting there and yet we all spend so much time in these in-between type places. I like the feeling that between here and there, anything can happen. Of course it mostly doesn't but when you're travelling, you're free of normal life in a way; suspended if you like. And it's always that anticipation that there may be an adventure ahead of you. I love living and working in London and it's important to me that I try express something about the world that I live in now. I like showing the ordinary part of the lives that we take for granted: getting the tube, standing on an escalator, catching a train and so the inspiration for a lot of my work is the London transport system. I like to start by doing lots of very quick drawings in my sketchbook, you know, on a railway bench, on the side of the road, in my car. I like to try and get everything sorted out as much as possible first. And then when I start cutting the linos, I'm freed up in way, you know, I've made a lot of decisions already, I don't need to worry about what's going where, I just concentrate on colours and getting the tones right and the mark making. So when you pull that first proof off the press, you never know what you're going to see. It could be, more or less what you planned, it could be, something unexpected. With print making, I also like the quality of the craft - that my prints are all hand-made, and hand-printed, by me, is important.
Views: 16543 1000 Londoners
Jake walks 3,000 miles to combat depression - Londoner #262
 
03:15
Jake struggles with depression and has found a unique way to combat it - by walking 3,000 miles across the UK. As Black Dog Walks he tells about his mission, to promote exercise as an effective way to manage mental health. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a ten-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter @1000_Londoners Instagram @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com TRANSCRIPT I, I actually called my mum that morning. Not, I didn't want help. I, I thought that I was gonna kill myself that day. I thought I'd woken up for the last time. I, I wanted to hear her voice one more time. I just, I, I forgot what feeling happy felt like. And I thought: if I can't remember what happy feels like then there's no point in being alive. It will be better for them if I'm not around. And that's, that's a really dangerous thought to have. In calling her, I heard the love in her voice and the concern. And that was, that was the first time it was, I'd ever said it to anybody. She, she said: well we need to get you help then, don't we? She was very sort of matter of fact and very calm and just, you know: this is what we're gonna do. And she, she made a decision for me. If I hadn't made the first step and actually said something then I might not be here. I think that's a big reason men don't talk, because they maybe assume that by talking it means that they're gonna have to crack themselves open and spill themselves out and examine all the pieces. and let everyone else see everything about them. And you don't have to do that. I don't think. I think you just need to say: I feel like shit today and I don't really know why. And if you choose the right person they'll probably go: yeah man, me too. About 1,5 year ago I decided to walk 3,000 miles around mainland Great Britain to promote exercise and being outdoors as a way of managing depression and overall mental health. When I started to walk I, I was yet to tell everyone what I was doing, which wasn't the scary bit. The scary bit was telling them why I was doing it because it's this thing that I've been hiding forever. All of a sudden I've got to tell everybody at once and, you know, I just, I just got bombarded for a week afterwards, people I've known for years, you know life and soul people, who were just saying: yeah, me too man. And it's amazing how many people go, go through it. People with depression aren't people on the peripheries of society, it is society. Everyone has that feeling. I've made the decision that if anyone starts talking to me at any point, if anyone offers me anything, if anyone, you know: just say yes, just get in a conversation with them. That's what I realise is good for my depression now, it's just, I need, I need to realise that the earth is a really good place and the people in it are good and they help me out. That's, that's the one big thing I've learned for sure. It feels like I'm, you know, you don't feel like you're wasting the day. You feel like you're actually living your life and I think when, when you have depression you need to, you need to look out for things that make you realise that, yeah, the world is actually a pretty great place and life is actually pretty special.
Views: 4339 1000 Londoners
"Everyone is a plane spotter," Henry - Londoner #258
 
03:30
Henry is an avid plane spotter, who believes everyone else is too - we just aren't ready to admit it. We meet Henry on Heathrow's plane spotters paradise Myrtle Avenue and discover how he got 'hooked'. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a ten-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter @1000_Londoners Instagram @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com TRANSCRIPT Everyone is a plane spotter, it's just whether they're willing to admit it or not (laughs) Because, even when I was working as a dispatcher at London City, whenever I was walking back into the terminal, I could see people taking pictures of the planes. They're doing the exact same thing as me, it's just that I'm prepared to say that I do it on purpose. People come from all over the world to Myrtle Avenue just to come to this spot to watch planes literally just land. (filmmaker Ruth) Have you got something that helps you track them? (Henry) Yes! Flightradar, it's where you can see where the planes are in real time. I can plan, as such. I can (laughs) (Ruth) There's gonna be a lot of that. (Henry) There's gonna be a lot of that. First flight I ever went on, was when I was 3 years old, I was going to Ghana and it was a Boeing 777. I was hooked! My family, now they're happy and now they support me, but before they used to think it was quite weird. Especially when I would wake up very early just to come and have a look at planes and then go back home. They used to think: why? At that time I wanted to be a pilot. It didn't happen, mainly because of finance which is a shame. I decided to go to uni and I did Aviation Management, which I think was one of the best decisions I ever made. I love it, absolutely love it. There are different types of plane spotters: there are the plane spotters that have the binoculars; the people that don't have the camera but they have a notepad, they will write down the aircraft registration; and there are plane spotters like me who take pictures and I use that as a way of logging what I've seen. It's rare to find a female plane spotter. They exist, but they're rare. (Ruth) Why do you think that is? (Henry) I don't know. It's a shame. It's a massive shame. (Ruth) Do you think that planes have a gender? (Henry) We tend to call the aircraft a she. We always say: oh she's beautiful! The 747 is commonly referred to as 'the queen of the skies'. (Ruth) And maybe some of them are sexy? (laughs) (Henry) There are some sexy planes going on, there are some sexy planes. Ooh (Ruth) Is that a sexy one? (Henry laughs) There's a lot of Facebook groups, a lot of Twitter feeds about plane spotting. There's quite an interesting mix of a community. I enjoy being part of that community. (Ruth) I'm getting into this now. I'm filming it without you, you know. (Henry) I know, I know. There is a 747 literally coming in. I find that plane beautiful (laughs).
Views: 4058 1000 Londoners
Inside a London souvenir shop with owner Stuart, Londoner #160
 
03:03
Stuart runs 3 souvenir shops in London and says the secret to the shop's success is his wife’s touch. Everyday over 900 tourists walk through the doors and each one is looking for an authentic London experience. This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: We started souvenir shop in ’87 outside St. Paul’s Cathedral in the old Paternoster square building. Originally I had a food shop where we were dealing with city workers. And they only had an hour to eat their lunch. We were only open three hours a day Monday to Friday and boy did they give you hard times. Whereas now the customers are free to browse as long as they like. They're in no pressure, no hurry to get anywhere and just like to talk, chat - it's great! This is ratty, he's a director of a company and likes to show people round the shop. And then of course we have Sooty …Sooty...who likes to keep the customers amused when she's not sleeping! Everybody who comes in the shop are happy and they all go for different things, for instance: Americans love t-shirts and baseball caps, people from Germany like efficient things like pencils and rubbers and rulers, things that are useful. Japanese buy tiny little things because they live in tiny spaces, Indians love shiny objects and things with sparkles on them, I'll bring ratty in for this… He likes to show the English what we like to buy. This is our favourite selling bus. And we have little models here, we have Sherlock Holmes, The Queen, and she waves her hand sometimes... like this you know, she likes to wave. And then we have groovy sunglasses, I could try them on... no maybe not. Lady Diana is still popular. Out of all the Royals I think she lives on the longest. The only secret is my wife's touch. Most souvenir shops in London are run by guys. And there is definitely a distinct difference in having a lady's eye during the buying of the products. The good thing about my job is that everybody who comes in is on holiday, they're happy and they just like to talk and like to speak to an English person.
Views: 16865 1000 Londoners
What's it like to take 3 dogs and 2 pigs for walks around West London? : Antonia, Londoner #128
 
03:08
Antonia lives in Fulham and runs a dress shop. She has 3 dogs, 2 cats and 2 pigs. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. 1000londoners.com youtube.com/1000londoners facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit chocolatefilms.com Transcript: You can come and say hello to them if you want to, they're quite friendly. So I rocked up to work one morning on my bike and saw this small, grey-ish sad looking dog that I thought was probably abandoned and I then took her home that night because I thought oh well I don't know what else to do and my husband had a fit and then the following day we took her to Battersea cos he was like we're not keeping this dog we have two dogs, two pigs, two cats, three kids we're not having another dog. I then said to my husband if I paid for her, could I buy her as my wedding anniversary present? And you could see my husband thinking "Oh shit, we've had a wedding anniversary I totally forgot about and she's offering to buy her own present" So I bring the dogs into work probably most days partly because when you have people who perhaps get a bit upset about their wedding dress fitting or they're in a state with their mother they basically need a reason to calm down. They can stroke a dog, calm down, it just lowers the temperature a bit. It's a bit of an unorthodox thing to own in West London, I do recognise that, they're fantastic animals and I got them because... Well I worked on a pig farm for about 17 months at one point. See I've had them since they were tiny, so as you can see they know that I'm the boss. And it's very useful to be able, when you've got a pig, it's very useful to be able to put your fingers in it's mouth without it severing your hand. Ooh cracky, cracky don't be such a pig. When you take on livestock your home becomes a farm so technically although we live in W12 our home is a farm and then I have a walking licence so I can walk them in two of our local parks too. So upset. Shall we go, come on then. This way, don't bite each other. Come on lads shall we go this way - good boy. Good boy. Come here, no don't bite me, here have a carrot and stop being stroppy. Sit, good pig. Good pig. No we'll have less shouting. Good boy, in. Snouty, in love.Good pig come on, yes alright Cracky, keep your hair on. Hello hello hello. A dog looks up to you and a cat looks down on you and a pig looks you straight in the eye. And who's that? Winston Churchill.
Views: 25573 1000 Londoners
Narrowboat living in London - Melvyn Jones, Londoner #88
 
02:12
Melvyn is a mature student who resides in a narrowboat along the River Lea. Primarily based in the North-East stretch of the Lea, Melvyn describes his home as a "miracle place". He loves the wildlife that the nearby marshlands offer, and the affordability of city living that his boat provides him with. A lover of education, he's recently finished a Masters degree in Creative Writing, and has embarked on another course in the field of Psychodynamic Therapies and Counselling. He spends his spare time either volunteering with local conservation groups, studying in the library, or having a beer with his boat-side friends. We meet Melvyn as he reflects on his way of living, the stereotypes attached to those who live on boats, and how age should never limit or restrict you from what you want to do. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. 1000londoners.com youtube.com/1000londoners facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit chocolatefilms.com Transcript: My name’s Melvyn and I live on a boat. I’ve only been here a couple of years, it’s on the river, it’s a lot of fun being here and also it gives me somewhere I can afford to live in London. There aren’t that many places in London where you can live on a boat, this feels like a bit of a miracle place, because it combines loads of things that really appeal to me…like the fact that I’m in a city, the fact that I’m next to some marshes where there’s plenty of wildlife, because I’ve always been a bit of a wildlife nerd, there’s a hell of a lot going on around here. I’m not in the boat very much because I’m out most of the time, I’m a bit, you know, sort of, a compulsive action man. So at the moment I’m quite keen on gardening. I’ve just finished an MA in Creative Writing - really enjoyable, met a load of interesting people. I’ve sort of shifted ground a little bit from the writing and I’m working a lot more in the field of psychoanalysis, psychodynamic therapy, counselling, that sort of thing. I’ve always thought education opens lots of doors, and you walk through and you’re in another world and it’s very exciting. The boat stereotype is that people that live on boats are certain sorts of people, well they’re not, you know, there’s all sorts of people that live on boats. I think I’ve always sort of struggled with stereotypes, well not struggled, but not really taken them that seriously and just tried to do what I think is worth doing. Age is…I’m always aware of it, and have been for many many years. I probably have been aware of age all my life. How you fit your age into the people around you. Here on my boat I’m with a community of people that come from all over the place, different ages, different backgrounds, and you know, I muddle along with most of them. I think that’s the secret of living in London, for me anyway, it’s knowing it’s all out there, then going out and finding it.
Views: 6524 1000 Londoners
"I didn't know what Windrush was!" Kenny Lynch - Londoner #311
 
03:15
Comedian and singer Kenny Lynch toured with the Beatles and appeared in Carry On Films. From Caribbean-Irish heritage, he was born in the East End in 1938 before the Windrush era. In his short portrait, Kenny talks about growing up in Stepney during the war. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a ten-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter @1000_Londoners Instagram @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: Evening all where do we start then. I was born in the East End of London in 1938. I love it down there, I love the people I still like it down there, the only trouble is I don't go down there too much now because I get lost. The war started, I think about eighteen months after I was born and it for kids I mean, when you got to about three or four though there was bombs dropping all the time it was, it was, it was fun. You just thought, oh look there's another house on fire. But obviously during the war everybody's very close together and all that it's only the day after the war stops that they all start fighting again, like they do now. No, well my father was here because he was in the Merchant Navy. Yeah my dad came over from Barbados in the late 1890's. He is very nice man, he made me what I was, he was very gentle. Never had a row with me, never hit me, never did anything like that and I loved him. And my mum's from an Irish background and all that. My family was 11 kids but, I mean I never met half of them, I mean I was the last one of them. And in fact now I'm the only one left out of all of them because they're all brown bread now. It was just a very fun family, no rows or anything.I mean there were obviously kids rows and all that, and we never had any racial problems with people in Cornwall Street you know because basically we were probably a novelty. You know people just say, you know people just say we've got some black people live next door to us and all that, you should come round and see them they're almost the same as us. That sort of thing must have been going on. But, basically I didn't see I didn't see loads even then until I was about 20. You'd notice more immigrants were coming in and all that sort of thing. I don't remember anybody ever telling me about Windrush. So that's why I'd never heard of it. I never knew what Windrush was until I was asked to do this big show on it for the BBC at the Crystal Palace, years afterwards. I had to ask my sister what it was doing this show for this thing called Windrush, What is that? She said 'Oh it's a boat they all came over on.' That's the first I've heard about it and by that time I was probably about 26. Everything's is funny to me, everything's musical to me, everything is readable to me and that's how I go through life and how I shall go for the next few weeks I've got left. Simple as that.
Views: 12345 1000 Londoners
"I just want to be mum to everybody," Sonia - Londoner #249
 
03:03
Sonia is the School Catering Manager at Wimbledon College. She is very fond of the students and says she wants to be "mum to everybody". Sonia has three children of her own, of which one is adopted and she's also a volunteer instructor with the army cadets. This Film was made on a Chocolate Films Workshop with 6th form students at Wimbledon College in partnership with Wimbledon Bookfest funded by the Wimbledon Foundation. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a ten-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter @1000_Londoners Instagram @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com TRANSCRIPT I've worked here eighteen years. I think I just want to be mum to everybody, like I am to my three kids at home. Oh this is what normally the leaving 6th formers, they give me a little parting gift. So if it's not flowers or chocolates I quite often get a few little teddies, so they're quite nice memories of boys that have gone. I think we've got 1,500 on roll. So 1,500 over 18 years is quite a lot of kids, and they're such good boys they still always come over and say hello which is lovely. So my husband often says "are we ever going to go anywhere and not see somebody you know?" I'm an instructor in the army cadets. First of all when I was asked, they were looking for volunteers, I really believed they needed a cook! And that I'd go away at weekends and maybe feed them. I didn't in my wildest dreams know that I was going to train like a regular soldier running round with rifles and things. My least favourite is the weapons. I like the adventure training. I abseiled off cliff Weymouth a few years ago and that was quite exciting. The kids wouldn't do it so I did it first. So they had to then, if an old granny can do it then surely the kids can. In there I'm still twenty. I have three children. My middle daughter, she's 25, although she's not actually mine, she's a young lady that I've brought up. I was asked to babysit her when she was 3 weeks old and the parents didn't come back for 8 months. And she's still with me now. I phoned the social services and said "look this has happened, it's not an issue, but do I need to legally tell somebody?" And then course you start the ball rolling and the social services come round, check, obviously that you're the right person, and myself and my husband did some fostering training But yeah it was difficult but not alien to me, because I found out at my mum's funeral when I was only 18, that one of my brothers wasn't my brother. So my mum had done exactly the same. So, it didn't even register that I wouldn't love this little girl that had been left at my house. I just like to be involved and help people. My mum always brought me up that if you can help others you should. This is what I tell the kids… They can make the change.
Views: 3135 1000 Londoners
Inspirational teacher & actor Arnold Oceng, #177
 
02:55
As a child, Arnold got talent spotted as an actor. He never wants to give up that dream. But he also wants to be a teacher for the rest of his life. Arnold’s greatest inspiration is his mum, he says. He comes from a Ugandan family of refugees. His father died and his mother has since then been the one strong pillar supporting Arnold in life. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: One of the kids in my class, when I was in primary school, his mum was a child agent, she came to watch him in a play and in doing so saw me at the same time, saw my mum at the end gave her a card and said your son has got talent, so I got talent spotted. My name is Arnold, but the students at Graveney School know me as Mr Oceng. My first day teaching? I was so nervous. My first day teaching, I think I shadowed another teacher. But it was good, the day went smoothly, it wasn’t as bad as I thought it would go. It was alright, I enjoyed it to be honest. I like teaching because I like working with young people. I feel like I’ve got a lot to say and I’ve got a lot to give and a lot of input that I never necessarily had when i was growing up. You know, an older version of me, looking at myself when I was in school, I never thought I’d be teaching in a secondary school but I really do enjoy it, it gives me a sense of purpose. Ok so year 9, what I’ve heard is, you guys are creating a pencil holder, is that correct? No? My main inspiration, honestly I’ve said it all the time, it would be my mum. You know I come from a family of refugees, my mum’s Ugandan, and you know, we came to this country, I came to this country when I was 1, but we came here running away from the civil war that was happening in Uganda, you know my father passed away so all these events that happened in my life, my mum has been the one pillar and the one strong thing that has always been there for me. Very very proud of you, no words can even explain it. Thank you Momma. Its very difficult to juggle both jobs because they’re both very demanding, and that’s the thing with acting, it’s hard to follow your dreams but then to try find steady income. You get asked many times by people that know you’re an actor, when’s your cut off point? Like if you haven’t made it by this age, when’s your cut off point? But I always say to them that I don’t have a cut off point, if this is your passion, you should never have a cut off point. Why? I would like to believe that I will never stop teaching, I hope I'm inspiring the students when im about or when I'm in school. Last thing I want to do is disrupt them, because I've always said if it gets to the point where i feel like that I'm disrupting their work, they start taking out phones, snapchatting and taking pictures of you, then that's not what i'm about. It's been a great response being here at the school and I’m happy.
Views: 6243 1000 Londoners
Jai Eleven - the 18 year old designer and entrepreneur behind 'nothing' fashion brand, Londoner #109
 
03:09
Jai is an 18 year old fashion designer who has started a successful clothing brand called 'Nothing'. We discover the motives and ambitions behind this teen entrepreneur who is about to start a Computer Science degree at the University of Essex. Our filming crew capture Jai at a photoshoot in Primrose Hill, Camden. He uses his brand to boost youth empowerment and creativity within society while attempting to crush common stereotypes surrounding young people. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. 1000londoners.com youtube.com/1000londoners facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit chocolatefilms.com Transcript: Hi my name's Jai I'm a young designer. We're at my shoot at Primrose Hill we're shooting an editorial for my brand. I'm currently on my summer holiday, I'm going to Uni in October to study computer science. So during this holiday I've just been designing for my Autumn Winter collection and just like doing extra research so I can make the brand better. I decided to call my brand nothing because I wanted to poke fun at street ware because everybody's like ah yeah I'm wearing Supreme, I'm wearing Margiela, I'm wearing Ralph. I wanted the name to remind people we shouldn't be slaves to all these materialistic things and objects - so yeah that's why I named it nothing. Selling a brand is quite easy - I used to have a job - I quit cos I hated it and I don't think, like, one hour of my time is worth £7.50 so I was just like... yeah, this is not for me. So I just decided, I quit back in January and I did the pop up store in the next two weeks and from there the brand just took off. Then I just used all the money I made, I've constantly been reinvesting all the money I make. I hardly spend money on myself it's just straight to the brand. There was a time where I was just broke, like flat broke- me cos I have a lot of pride so I don't like asking people for money so I was just really broke and depending on the sales of the brand to like fund my lifestyle in a way if that makes sense. In the end I just asked one of my friends for some money and yeah, I finessed the system. I decided to study Computer Science cos it's just another hobby of mine. The fashion and the street ware thing is just one part of me - I would like to describe myself as a complex character but yeah computer science is like, not really a back up plan - it's just there. The grime and the fashion culture - you can't have them without each other. They played a major role in my brand because it's been able to like connect people - I can see road men wearing my stuff now, I can see fashion kids that like Supreme and Margiela and everything wear the same brand and that's like connecting them into one sub group. I call it a lifestyle brand because my brand is all about empowering young kids. I want young people to see what I'm doing with my brand and I want them to be motivated I want them to be like ok - I've seen this guy do it, maybe I can try.
Views: 7306 1000 Londoners
Yan Zi, a 34th generation Shaolin Kung Fu Master in Tufnell Park, Londoner #72
 
03:14
Shifu Shi Yan Zi is a 34th generation Shaolin Master and one of the chief disciples of the Abbot of the Shaolin Temple in China (Shi Yong Xin). Yan Zi is a prominent GongFu master. In 1983 Shi Yan Zi was trained at the Martial Arts College of Shaolin and became a disciple of the Abbot in 1987. Shaolin Kung Fu refers to a traditional system which was born from Ch'an Buddhism. Amongst the various types of Kung Fu, the Shaolin system is believed to be the founding style of all martial arts. This tradition began around 1,500 years ago. Yan Zi came to London in February 1998 and set up Shaolin Temple UK, a martial arts school, after six months of arriving. The temple is a centre for study of the Shaolin culture, in particular kung fu (Gong Fu-Ch’an), Qigong and Ch'an Buddhist Meditation. The temple is located in Tufnell Park, North London. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. 1000londoners.com youtube.com/1000londoners facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit chocolatefilms.com Transcript: "Kung fu is the art of fighting, without fighting." So you need to have will power and be ready and prepared for hard work that's the outside you can see, but what you cannot see is the moral, it's the righteousness. My name is Shi Yan Zi, I came from the Shaolin temple China. I'm 48 years old. I came to London eighth of February 1998. Martial Arts is training your body challenge your weak side, challenge your laziness. Then you learn from the step by step through the basic training through the flexibility, coordination Then through perseverance, which is from the will power. Then you can grow success. They have to understand that in Kung Fu, to gain the kung fu is from hard training. It's not one or two days you can achieve. I've be training Shaolin Kung Fu, since I was like fifteen, sixteen. So until now, it's more than thirty years. Kung Fu is both, it's like the ying and the yang, the balance. With the yang you can see the actions, of the fighting arts. The moral side you cannot see, that's inside the body, and your mind. Your character. Because it's hard and you want to improve, you have to build up your will power and your confidence and you can have a strong discipline. All that, will help your life. You spend some time in the quiet to think about the universe. Anything you see, doesn't matter human, animal, tree, bird, fish. They have one character is they constantly change. No one can stop, no one can stop them.
Views: 7939 1000 Londoners
Elisa Biondi, horticulturist in Kew Gardens' Princess of Wales Conservatory, Londoner #82
 
02:58
Elisa, a horticulturist at Kew Gardens, is one of the only Londoners to work in 10 different climates on a daily basis: from tropical rainforest to savanna desert. She loves nature and is especially happy around cacti... 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: I come from the north east of Italy, where there aren't many big cities around. My dad used to take me to the woods in the mountain quite often. So I've always seen trees and nature and I've always thought that was normality. And then obviously I came to London, and it's an extremely green city, it's just so different. When you choose to get a career in horticulture, You do know that you won't earn a lot of money but you do know that you will do what you do because you love it. My connection with cacti is quite strange because where I come from there are obviously not cacti. I'm not sure exactly what it is, the first time I saw them, I started to really like them, I guess because they are somehow quite human, I don't know. And also the fact they're usually kind of green and maybe not necessarily beautiful. When they flower they're just completely different and it's a bit like some people. You don't get to really like them until you properly meet them. This one has got hair as well. They look like grandpas. So that little water lily there is a Nymphaea thermarum. It comes from Rwanda but unfortunately it's extinct in the wild. Having a good relationship with nature is important because everything starts from nature, everything we've got thanks to nature. And making sure that you understand that and you are kind of thankful to nature for what you've got. I think it's really important and everybody in my opinion should worship nature and be proud to live in this world and respect nature mainly.
Views: 5957 1000 Londoners
Londoner #157 Phil, a bus tour guide in central London
 
03:01
We hop on the top deck of a London tour bus to spend some time with Phil, who has miraculously stayed in a job he took one summer for some extra cash… 15 years ago. Now a tourist favourite and low key star of the tour bus circuit, Phil reflects on what appeals to him so much about the job and the assortment of people he meets doing it. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: Never forget that the people on your tour are on holiday. You know, that they’re here to enjoy the place, they might never come back to this city again. It might be that their plane's been diverted and they've been sent to London for a day or so, nobody knows! So we’re going to slowly but surely make our way up towards Oxford Circus. You have to always remember that you’re an ambassador for not only London but also England and Great Britain, because you might be the only person that these people on the bus talk to in their entire tour maybe. And they remember you, and then they write it on trip advisor, hopefully, fingers crossed you get five stars! And I tell you, you get that first five star review and you’re like check that out! Somebody once asked me what the Marble Arch was made of. I thought that was a lovely question. And I asked her, how long is it since you slept, and the answer was 48 hours. We’ve seen some strange things, I’ve seen it snow, I’ve seen the sun come out. The Queen waves by the way, Prince Phillip never waves, Charles always waves, Tony blair used to wave, David Cameron waves. Kylie was on the bus, she was on the Big Bus but she wasn’t on my bus, you know, which was a shame... "Hello mate how are you? Good to see you” I really like that by the way, I like the Shard, I like the London Eye because it’s half and hour, you know on it, off it, done, you know. I also contemplated whether I’d take up stand up comedy. There’s some good stand up comics out there now though, it’s a busy world to get into. You know, tour guiding, you can still be up here. I can still be my own little ‘nobody’s ever heard of’ celebrity. So they had to spend millions of pounds on adding all of that stuff on the front to stop the sun shining off it. It’s a passion, it’s a hobby and a passion as well you know.The Shard. I watched The Shard go slowly but surely bigger and bigger. I’ve got a whole collection of photographs at home of it going bigger and bigger and bigger until its finished. And that corner building is a nice little pub, it’s a Whetherspoons...inexpensive. I have the advantage of being the tour guide in London. And I could talk about... just everything! May the force be with you, and may the force be with you, yes... don't go over to that dark side.
Views: 7445 1000 Londoners
Andy McNab, the ex-SAS Bravo Two Zero author returns to his Peckham roots  - Londoner #26
 
03:14
Best-selling author and ex-SAS sergeant Andy McNab is a Londoner through and through. At just two weeks old, he was abandoned at Guy’s Hospital and adopted by a family in Peckham and spent his childhood living in South London. The new film follows Andy as he revisits the London of his past. He has his hair cut at a local barber shop, walks around the market and finally ends up on Nunhead Reservoir. This Peckham is a different place to the one he left to join the forces, and makes Andy consider the city’s changing face. Like Peckham, Andy’s identity has transformed throughout his life. He took the name of his adopted family, changed his name again when he became an author, and now lives a life far removed from his life he was born into. Andy talks about his feelings about the city he knows and loves. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: Short back rip round today mate. Nobody is going to believe that I cut Andy McNab's hair. Flippin' heck. You must be thinking, is that it? Is that it? Expect you'd be about 7 foot tall or something. The reason I've end up being called Andy McNab was quite simply that there was symmetry in the name and it fit quite nice on the cover of Bravo Two Zero. The problem I've got is because of the stuff that I used to do in Northern Ireland, in fact I was over there last year, last October, doing stuff for the police charities over there. And even then I got two death threats, that's the reason why I don't show my face. One of the good things of, you know, being not so in the public domain is that you can get on public transport. You know, get on the buses, get on the tube. And you get around, quite fast. You know, I quite like the oyster card, it's alright. You're mum used to do cleaning? When I got left at Guy's Hospital as a baby, I was only a couple of days old so you know, I've never actively tried to find out who my parents were. 'Cause as far as I was concerned, exactly the same as my older brother, that's who my parents are. You must have a bit of Greek in you Andy, I'm telling you. You've got to, you've absolutely got to. Let's do that, yep. Andy? Brilliant Steve, thanks very much mate. Have a lovely time in Cyprus. See you. When I got out of the military and then I started using, you know, the pseudonym for, you know, Andy McNab. It was quite easy to adapt into that persona. Because it was only going to be, just one book. One of the good things about London is that it constantly reinvents itself.The area is, sort of, rebuilding. It's regenerating and it really just has to happen. Especially here from, I don't know about 8 years old. 8 or 9. And constantly moving around. Say, we was on this road and then we moved down to another place called Oglanda. We lived in Catford for a while, then we come back. It was all over the place. Cheers mate, and you. Being a kid round here was actually...was always breaking in or trying to nick something. Fantastic. If I could say anything to 9 and 10, 11 year old Andy - stay at school, get that education. 'Cause every time you learn something, you get a bit of power. That's what this city's all about. Get out there and compete. Getting into film, getting into book, all those sort of thing has been a constant change for me. And it's a bit like what we're seeing here, you know, is constant change.
Views: 19380 1000 Londoners
Robin Stevenson from Crouch End who always wears Georgian clothing - Londoner #49
 
03:05
Robin is different. He dresses every day in self-made outfits from the Georgian period. Committed to freedom of expression, in this film he tells us what it is about the past that intrigues him and how he lives day to day in the present. This film was made by young people aged 15 - 24 at part of Y-Touring’s Summer activities programme at OneKX over a 5-day 1000 Londoners workshop. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. 1000londoners.com youtube.com/1000londoners facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit chocolatefilms.com Transcript: My style of dress is vaguely 18th Century. Round about 1780's-ish. Definitely not pirate, despite what other people seem to believe. Because it's my normal every day clothing, it's not me wearing costume, I don't really worry about authenticity for everyday wear. It's what I feel comfortable in and it gives an idea of the style. Jeans and T-shirt have never appealed to me. I run a cafe in a library in Crouch End but I'm also an artist. I paint and sculpt. I think I last did an office job about 20 years ago. Normally, an average day, I'll bump into someone who goes: "Oh I know who you are, I've seen you around". I was walking to work one morning and some chap in a big black expensive car, actually stopped his stopped his car, wound down the window and shouted at me. He was really angry that I was a disgrace and I should be ashamed of myself. And I thought, he must be having a very hard day and probably a very hard life to consider getting angry over what everyone else is wearing in the street. I grew up doing battle reenactments from the age of five. So my weekends from five onwards were spent in the country wearing 17th Century basically. I was very used to wearing period costume and my mother makes period costume. I've never dressed what one can consider normal. I used to go to art college wearing full dinner tuxedo and white gloves and things. I identify with the late 18th Century because it was this age of revolution in social and political and creative and big ways. Yes, the 18th Century, everything happened. I grew up in an environment where knowledge was something to be treasured so I kind of settled into a mode of going: "I like that so I'll wear that". I've been known to make various bits myself, I adapt waistcoats, my mother makes frock coats and tail coats because she makes period costume and because she's my mother. It means that actually my average style of dress is cheaper than the average jeans and T-shirt combo that most people wear. I've always chosen myself rather than, deliberately choosing to dress differently to the mainstream, I've never considered myself being part of the mainstream and thus it's easy, it's me. I don't understand why people feel the need to be pressurised into not being themselves. Yeah, I find peer pressure a sad thing. It's good to be yourself.
Views: 6640 1000 Londoners
Ted Roberts, a cheeky Chelsea Pensioner takes us inside the Royal Hospital- Londoner #22
 
03:10
Meet Ted, a Chelsea Pensioner and self pronounced 'naughty boy'! How to enjoy life after service is a perennial question for our armed forces, but Ted has found the answer. Visitors to London's stylish Chelsea neighbourhood may have seen these dignified former servicemen and women padding up and down the King's Road, or in the stands at the cup final at Wembley. Ted is a real Londoner (with an eye for mischief) enjoying a palatial retirement in the heart of the London establishment at the Royal Hospital. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: I like messing about, I like having a laugh. Life's too short, so if you can make someone laugh every day, you've cracked it. That hat actually is not mine. I had to borrow that off a friend of mine. And that was sliding down me head, that's why I'm laughing. I'm saying 'hurry up and take the photo, it's moving'. Lots of laughs, that's probably why I didn't get promoted. United nations medal, that's the only one I got. I never got my LS&GC because I got a bit of a record. Bit of a naughty boy. And that photo is the wife. God bless her. Yeah, miss her. My ceremonial duties, they mean a lot to me. Because it reminds me of the days when I used to do it in the regular forces. And it's good, I like the uniformity of everything. Retirement's fantastic, as long as you keep active and don't sit about and forget about the world outside. Keep going, or find something to do all the time. Keep your mind active. The edge between life and death was thin. But then I discovered discipline. I learnt to smile when I felt sad. I learnt to take the good and the bad. I learnt to care a great deal more for the world about me than before. I began to forget the 'me' and 'I' and join in life as it rolled by. This may not mean sheer ecstasy but it's better by far than 'I' and 'me'.
Views: 5713 1000 Londoners
Tracy Chevalier, author of Girl With a Pearl Earring, is Londoner #201
 
03:17
Tracy Chevalier is the celebrated author of Girl With a Pearl Earring. We meet the born American in her home in North London and get a glimpse at how she likes to write. Tracy also shares her feelings on becoming a well-known author. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com. TRANSCRIPT I was writing a novel called The Last Runaway and it was set in 19th century Ohio. I was looking into what women did with their hands in their leisure time and quilting became an obvious answer. So, I decided to have my main character be a quilter. And then I thought, you know: If I'm gonna write about this, I really need to do it a bit myself. It uses a completely different part of my brain and I love that about it. (whispers) Come on, come through, there. I prefer to write longhand. I write in notebooks and then every few days I type what I've written into the computer. I just prefer writing with a pen and paper because it feels closer to me. The problem with writing something on the computer is that, you know, it looks so pretty, it looks so done. So, somehow you read through it, I mean I learned not to, but you read through it and think: Oh, yeah this looks ok. It looks kind of typeset, it almost looks published. And this is not typeset or published. This is very messy. And that's kinda how I think. These are all different fabrics that are, some of them are from my own life. I was a bit of a hippie when I was a teenager and I had this sundress that was black with purple stars on it. So that's that bit there, the black with purple… It's so faded that it's grey now, I wore it so much. And then the bottom bit was this kind of North African market scene, where somewhere around here there's some fantastic legs from the market. I grew up in a much more innocent time and I think I just would like to find a way to get back to that, to help people to get back to that. See you can't quilt when you're angry. You can't sew when you're angry. You have to be calm. I went to Wandsworth Prison to talk to the guys about quilts and quilting. And we ended up doing a project together. It was really, really satisfying. And it was so cool to see these guys, you know these big beefy guys who are doing a lot of weights and have a lot of tattoos and who knows what they've been in for. I never ask, it's better not to. But they, they make these beautiful things. Every now and then I think: Oh yeah, back when I wrote Girl With a Pearl Earring, nobody knew what I was doing, nobody expected anything from me. And just every now and then I think: Oh, it'd be so nice to be fresh and innocent again. And instead I'm that kinda jaded, old writer, just crankin' em out.
Views: 3885 1000 Londoners
Save Norton Folgate - Londoner #165, David Milne, curator of Dennis Severs House
 
02:58
David is the curator of Dennis Sever’s House, which is located in an area of Spitalfields that has 18th century houses and warehouses, and holds great historical importance. The City of London have plans to gentrify the area, which David is campaigning to stop. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: Here we are outside of Dennis Severs' House, in the district of Liberty of Norton Folgate, which is in fact the very site we're fighting to save from the destruction and re-development by British Land. For the last 16 years I've been the curator of Dennis Severs' House. My real responsibilities is to maintain the house and take it forward into the future as it always has done. This room I've slept in on and off for the last 25 years of my life. So the house really has the sense of being home. It's a great piece of magic and wonder that, you know, Dennis left us. It's a rare jewel in the city that seems to be building itself into towers of glass. Here we are, standing outside the only few surviving early 18th century houses, in the Liberty of Norton Folgate. Under the plans of British Land, there won't be any shops here, these buildings will stay, all the facades will stay but actually, you know, we won't be looking at blue sky, we'll be looking at glass that reflects the sky. As we bask in the reflected light from the skyscraper. I thought I'd just throw that in, in case anybody watching this thinks oh God, they've got the lighting a bit wrong. I grew up always in old buildings. I went to a school that was, you know, started life as a medieval monastery and I've always had a liking for old things. This city's thousands of years old. Sadly, the big threat now of course is that everybody wants to remove it. There will be no trace of any human being who ever struggled and lived within a chamber like this that was once a home. That's what this house is, and that's really what this whole campaign is about, to enable people to live her and to not just flow in their hundreds and thousands and out again, into the suburbs of the city for buildings that actually we don't need. It's beautiful isn't it? There's nothing left of the original interiors and it's everything that's happening now. You can keep the facade of a historic listed building but everything else can go inside of it and that's of course is everything that British Land want to do. And up here, that's the face of the new city.
Views: 2866 1000 Londoners
Fleur Bothwick, who unintentionally found her biological father - Londoner #35
 
03:04
Fleur was adopted at the age of six weeks old, she had never wanted to find her family deliberately, but unknowingly ran across her birth step mum six years ago while caring for her dad. She explains how finding her family has opened up a new part of her life, the uncanny appearances of her and her siblings shocked her, but she has since got used to having an extended family. The life changing experiences she has faced in the heart of London makes her an extraordinary and interesting Londoner. 1000 LONDONERS ‘Fleur' is part of the series of 1000 Londoners films, made by people living and working in the capital. The films released are part of the 1000 Londoners second phase, filmed by community groups within London; providing an honest and raw perspective of our city. The community groups include schools, museums and galleries. The series has been generously supported by the London Transport museum, The Roundhouse, Y-Touring, Tower Hamlets Futureversity, Lambeth Summer University, The Royal Borough of Greenwich Drugs, Alcohol and Mental Health Integrated Commission and Providence Row homeless charity. This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: It's difficult to say what it was like in my childhood as an adopted child because it's all I ever new. My Mum told me from day one that I was adopted and that I was a very special baby because she'd chosen me I sometimes thought about finding my birth Mother I didn't think of them, I'd never thought of them as my parents, because I grew up with my parents. But I did know that if I did I had tried to find my birth mother, it would have upset my Mum because I think she would have felt she had some how failed me. About six years ago my mother died which was very sad but she had been ill for a long time and my father had been her carer. So we had hoped that this would give him a new lease of life, but he was so heart broken his health declined so we started to look for a nursing home. After about six weeks of him being there a lady came in and introduced herself as Elizabeth McManus, the owner of the nursing home. And she said to me that she was really shocked to have met me because I was so like her daughter I looked like her daughter, I sounded like her daughter I laughed like her daughter. So I said, as I often did, well you never know, I'm adopted I could have come from anywhere. All I knew was that my birth mother was an Irish nurse called Kathy Quinn and at that Mrs. McManus in a really shocked way slumped in her chair in reception and said I have the most terrible news for you. Your Father dies twelve years ago and I was married to him. Unfortunately for reasons I don't know, from that day on Mrs. Mc Manus denied ever having the conversation with me. And she wouldn't even tell me the name of my birth father. Fast forward eighteen months. A very close friend of mine was building her own ancestry model and we searched and we found my birth sisters birth certificate and in my empty column she had Owen Francis McManus, with the same address. So that was clear to me my sister and my birth mother and birth father. So one of the really lovely gifts that my new sister gave me was a whole album full of pictures of the family So I could see then at different stages and ages It opens up the history book for me to see some of the special occasions they celebrated together. I think as my middle son said, it was all about finding my face, so for the first time I could meet people and actually see myself and my children reflected And I think there's nothing in the world like feeling that you belong and that people what you. And want to encourage you.
Views: 10197 1000 Londoners
Punch and Judy Professor Gary, Londoner #155
 
03:07
Gary has been obsessed with Punch and Judy since he was a child. When he was 15 he performed at the Millennium Dome and is now one of the most respected ‘professors’ in the country. He even makes all of his puppets, carving them in the courtyard outside his shared flat in Kennington. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: I don't think there was ever a moment when I said "I want to be a Punch and Judy man." Well I first saw Punch and Judy as a kid on the beach in Weymouth, and I just loved it It's one of those things that just gets under your skin, and if the professor was doing two, three shows a day I'd watch every single one, I'd drag Mum and Dad to go and watch the show. I've never really grown up I suppose. There's as many different Punch and Judy shows as there are professors, really It all starts with the same basic framework of a story, and we add and take away bits and put our own personalities into it really. Roll up, roll up ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls. The next Punch and Judy show is just about to begin. Roll up, Roll up! Hello everybody! The whole thing about Punch and Judy is that it's a connection with the past. There's something about the tradition, which I love and you're doing something that was done in the same way pretty much hundreds of year ago. I don't want to play with people's expectations too much. -Don't do that to me We move the show on a little bit, to come along and do a Victorian show would just be... ridiculous -(evil laughter) I'm the devil! -Nigel Farage? -Nigel Farage? I'm not that bad mate! The puppets I had were sort of getting a bit... a bit too battered to kind of just put a touch of paint on, so I thought well why don't I just try and make my own? -How do you do? How do you do? -Ha ha ha ha This is the first Punch I made, and it takes about – this one took about 3 weeks. I mean, you have to touch up his nose and repaint him from time to time but that head should last a lifetime. That's another one of mine, this is a Punch that I've made for David. He's a big collector of Punch and Judy puppets. It started recently, people have been asking me to make them puppets, but I don't have the space. Here in Kennington I live with 2 other lads that work in the theatre, so it's a house share but we do have a courtyard so I can take them outside and do a bit of woodwork, a bit of light woodwork. Don't know what the neighbours think. You're part actor, part puppeteer, part comedian, part director, you know, part artist, everything I like to have full control over it, so I can get everything as I want it. If you've enjoyed the show there's a hat going around, and if you'd like to make a contribution we'd be very grateful. I try, you know, it's not something that I carry around with me, I don't get Mr Punch out of his box too often when I'm at home... because that would be a bit weird (laughs) Thank you very much Mrs. Bags of Fun -Have you got it all in one handful Yeah, big hands! (laughs) Cheers, thanks for that. Funny way to make a living innit (laughs)
Views: 12818 1000 Londoners
Hyacinth, a visually impaired knitter from Acton - Londoner #27
 
03:14
This weeks Londoner Hyacinth from Acton, came over to London 45 years ago and started a large family, of whom she is the only original Jamaican. Now she lives in a supported residential home. However she is empowered by her practice in art and knitting. Hyacinth is living proof that a rich and fulfilling cultural life can be had for those with sight loss. "My sight is going but my brain is active" says Hyacinth. The new film on 1000londoners.com follows Hyacinth as she attends a knitting class. Whilst her sight has been deteriorating, she has experienced a heightened sensitivity to texture. Hyacinth is living proof that a rich and fulfilling cultural life can be had for those with sight loss. She is a keen visitor of art galleries She finds knitting "relaxing and therapeutic", even though her own prejudice told her initially that it would be boring! 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com TRANSCRIPT I don't complain about things I can't change. I can't change my eye-sight so I just get on with it. I grew up with my gran and my gran was a all-round seem-tress, knitter. She tried teaching me to sow when I was little but I think she gave up[ after I kept sowing my fingers to the material. My mum, she passed away nine weeks ago, she couldn't teach me to crochet right, because the needles are too small. I've got a few things I would like you to look at, that people have made this term. This was Hyacinth's first garment that she made. You couldn't knit at all, could you? No I couldn't. She still can't knit actually but! No, I joke, I joke aside. You're doing brilliantly. When I gave my niece a dress for her daughter, because this is for my grand-niece, my nieces daughter, this one's for my nephew, they were quite amazed. I felt quite pleased as well, quite proud of myself. I find it quite relaxing - that's when I'm not dropping stitches, which I do quite frequently! Because my sight problems are hereditary. My daughter, she's short sighted as well but all I wish for is that her sight doesn't go the way mine does that's one thing I wish won't happen. It's nice to see all the different work, or in my case not to see them, to feel the different work. And this is done in cotton, again it gives you quite a, yeah it's quite a different feel again from the wool you have been feeling. I try not to be grumpy, I do get grumpy sometimes. It's just over the last couple of years, my sight has gotten worse because up to a point I was still able to read very large prints but now I just can't read anything whatsoever. When one sense is going, you have to rely on the others so yeah, touch is important. When I am doing my cleaning and stuff, I wear rubber gloves, I take them off to make sure I have everything.. but no it is important. When I go to the galleries, I prefer the sculptures because you're allowed to touch them, you can't do that with pictures. At the end of the day, like I said, I just get on with my life, it's no use sitting there and complaining about it, it's something that I have to deal with, and I'm dealing with it. There might be somebody out there in the same position as me who has no family or any support, so I count myself lucky.
Views: 4114 1000 Londoners
John Jasinski, who's taking on his first pro cage fight in Whitechapel - Londoner #9
 
03:11
John is Polish and has not lived in London for long, however he is enjoying life here and has thrown himself into one of London's more underground sports -- mixed martial arts cage fighting. His first ever competitive fight took place at the Troxy in Limehouse with the promoter WCMMA. He has recently become a father to his baby daughter, born in December 2013. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: This is my first fight and I'm a little stressed out. I've got a chance to fight in the WCMMA. I hope I can win. I feel excited, motivated, strong. I think I can do it. Polish Strength! This next fight is the hardest fight of his life. John Jasinski is going against the guy so hard. Mr. Collins. John! To be honest, I've always been a fighter. I just wanted to do it in a ring, properly and make money from it. There is a huge problem in our country with finding well paid jobs and so I came here. I came here after my injury and worked on building site for a while and I was expecting to find a good well paid job of course I thought it would be nicer and cleaner here because that's what it's like in my country. I live in London with my girlfriend. We just had a baby actually, two weeks ago. I hope that my child will grow up healthy and happy and I hope to work hard and support my family. That's all really. That's my hopes for the future. That's all I hope for. You learn more from a battle, you leaner more from a battle than just even fight. Where is the shower? There is no shower here. This is shower here. This is shower, where you shower? I am going to train even harder and next time I'll do even better.
Views: 4976 1000 Londoners
Dennis Edwards, 48 years selling flowers in Covent Garden - Londoner #66
 
03:08
Having worked at Covent Gardens Flower Market for 48 years, Dennis is a bit of an institution. At 65, he has been everything from a night porter to a floor manager at the market; he lives and breathes flowers. Up from the crack of dawn selling to florists all over the world, Dennis has hundreds of clients, he even did the flowers for Princess Diana’s funeral. We meet Dennis in the midst of the Valentine's day rush. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com
Views: 10004 1000 Londoners
80 yr old cannabis campaigner Lee Harris, Londoner #146
 
03:00
Local legend Lee Harris is standing for Mayor of London and campaigning to legalise cannabis. Follow him as he campaigns around Portobello Road. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: Abortion, divorce, gay rights, women's rights, everybody, everything will change except cannabis and we think it's time that this country gets rid of it archaic laws and becomes part of the 21st century. Can I give you one of these, I'm standing for London Mayor today. Are you? To legalise cannabis. You're not? Yes I am. Really? What's the shop? Alchemy just around here next to the Mau Mau Bar, two doors. Yeah Yeah that's your shop is it? Yes, I've been there 45 years. What is it? It's a head shop, tattoo and piercing, I sell cigarette papers, incense, cards. Oh it's an utter pleasure to meet you all. And you. One love, I'm a Buddhist you see. You're Buddhist as well? I got married in a Buddhist temple in Barns by about 5 Thai monks, you see. I think cannabis should be legalised because it's a herb, it's a plant and it's a healing plant. As the Rasters say 'it is the weed of wisdom. I started smoking cannabis at the age of twenty seven and so I was part of what was know later to be known as the counter culture or the hippies. By the summer of love I was really turned on and my mind was blown. Thank you! Are you voting? Lovely bless you, thank you very much. One love to you. Well I'm definitely getting a lot of votes in the Portobello Road. Well I've been called for so long a local legend or a living legend and now I don't know what they think but I'm pleased I'm so accepted in the road. There's nothing I can do anymore it's up to the people to vote. this is such a dream come true and I'm nearly 80 in a couple of months and nobody told me at 80 years old I'd be having so much fun because we expect to be old and dying, it's a wonderful time to be alive .
Views: 2442 1000 Londoners
The decapitated head keeper at The London Bridge Experience, meet Kirsty #159
 
03:03
Kirsty moved to London with hopes of becoming an actor in the West End. She landed a job in The London Bridge Experience, an historical interactive theatre experience. She has been working there for 4 years. She can perform the same show up to fifty times a day. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: As long as you love it you'll be fine. You have to love what you're doing. If you can get to that point... it's okay. If you want something enough you will get there, you just need to keep working at it. We run shows approximately every 10 to 15 minutes. It can be very tiring on your voice. I've done that show many times. I thought it would be a lot easier than it is to be an actor. I thought if you were good and enthusiastic enough you would be picked up and that would be fine you would always be in work. It's such a hard industry to be in. It's such a hard industry to be in, it's such a difficult craft to have. And there's a lot of people that take advantage of that. I walked in, said that this was my dream job and sort of begged and I finally got a job working on the operations side of it and then from there I progressed, moved into the history department. We run shows every 20 minutes so we do about 20 shows a day. Whereas in high season I think I've done up to about 50 a day. There's a bridge that rumbles and then drops and you can hear that from in here. So when we hear that we go down to the next job. So that's my cue now in the background so I'll be back. It's a very close community. Everyone I know that is an actor supports every other actor that they know. They will always help when it comes to line learning or anything like that everyone helps each other. It's not easy it's a very difficult industry to be in to be honest. You've never really got security in a lot of things. However if you love it enough that doesn't matter. You just have to stick with it and the right thing will come along!
Views: 11571 1000 Londoners
Fiona Haughey, the archeologist who excavates the foreshore of the Thames - Londoner #32
 
03:09
Fiona's interest in archeology began when she was a little girl, but due to her mother's old fashioned ideas she never pursued such an "unladylike" profession. After Fiona's own 6 children grew up and flew the nest, she decided to study her childhood passion and has since become the only Archaeologist with a PhD in the River Thames. Fiona spends much of her time excavating on the foreshore but is more interested in people than precious metal, as she is fascinated by what artefacts reveal about the social make-up of a city. Many people consider the Thames to be a river that divides London, but Fiona sees it as the glue that holds everything together. This film is part of 1000 Londoners Totally Thames season. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com TRANSCRIPT: People are always intrigued. "Oh, I've always been interested in that" And then they'll go on and talk about dinosaurs and you have to quietly say that Archeologists don't deal with dinosaurs we only deal with human remains and the two are never there together Even as a small child I read about digs all over the world Which just fascinated me. But was never able to get onto that sort of thing To be honest, as far as my Mother was concerned it wasn't a lady like thing to do, so I went off as a teacher for a bit, you see. I mean, even in the 1920's when Mortimer Wheeler was digging, they talked about lady "graduates" going down in dresses and apparently, they were going down the ladders and it was very muddy, so they were removing their stockings and that was considered quite shocking for them to go down, you see. But now I mean, there's a huge number of women in Archeology. Basically you digging in the ground on your hands and knees for hours on end. But even just here you can see all sorts, there's a lot of bottles, a lot of metal work, chalk and bricks. Everything on the shore has a story to tell. 1500's that one, you can tell by the hole, on it. I've always found it fascinating. Every time you go down, it's never quite the same. You'd go down and the tide would keep going out and out And you'd get amazing structures that would just suddenly appear, that you didn't know were there and could totally change the way you think of it. I'm often on the Thames on a December morning, you know, that's real Archeology I think. If you can get out of your warm bed and crawl down there on a December morning, that's hardcore. This is part of a Roman roof tile, when it was laid out to dry, a little puppy ran over it and you can see the paw print here. I like to think it was a British dog, a bit of retaliation against the invaders. I mean I've never been one to wanting to find weaponry, a lot of people want to find sword and things in the river, that's never appealed to me. It's people I'm much more interested in, not just the human remains, but the way they lived and the way they did stuff, that's more of an interest to me. One of the things I get a lot of pleasure out of is people's reactions. People are so interested in it, you know it's not just stuck behind in a glass barrier in a museum, they can pick them up and look at them, they can handle history. Every piece that we pick up of the shore, has a history it can resonate.
Views: 3939 1000 Londoners
Sarah Ramsay, the head of one of Britain's oldest circus families - Londoner #6
 
03:08
Sarah is the matriarch of a circus troupe. As the daughter of circus impressario, she was born and raised as part of a circus family and has now taken over the day to day running of the circus. She spent much of her childhood in London's green spaces and has recently returned to touring in the capital. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: When I was small we traveled always in London. We used to stand on Shepherd's Bush. We could still stand on Tooting Bec now, Crystal Palace, Blackheath Common. So I've basically grown up in London, even though I've grown up in a circus, I've grown up in London. Well it's the same for circus people and the same for... You've either got the sawdust in your veins or you haven't and the sawdust is well and truly planted in my veins, I've always loved the circus since I was a tiny little girl. Always, even when I was small, just a toddler, there's pictures of me, in them days we still had performing animals, sitting on elephants, horses. I can't even remember learning to ride a horse, I've been able to ride all my life. Gerry Cottle is my father and we're a big circus, we are a family circus, my sister's are here, my nieces my daughter, my other sister runs the ticket office, I work in the circus, my father travels with us still today even though he doesn't perform anymore, keeping us all in line. I love everything about it, I love the travelling, I love going to different places and different towns every week. Even when it's wet and muddy I can just cope with it, I love it. The troop are not from a circus, many of them. So we train them at our circus school in Wookey Hole, and then when they've finished their schooling and they're at the correct standard, they then come and join us in the show. My daughters are in the troop and my nieces are in the troop but I've got another 12 so, I have to do everything, you know, tell them to pick their costumes up. Any dramas, I have to sort it out, come and take them to the doctors, "where's the nearest supermarket? Can you take me". I'm basically the group chaperone so I get pretty lucky. 'We're your babies'. Yeah they're my babies. 'Hello!' So obviously there's no animals in the circus anymore but we've got rollerskating, bikes, wheel of death, magic, aerial silks, hula hoops. It's a full house of circus acts. Working in London now is very different, very different, I mean we've been quite surprised here at Clapham Common because this is a known circus ground. Back when traveling circuses first started, this was one of the very original grounds. When I was a younger girl, and the last time we stood here, our tent would be packed every night, and now we're only half full so I think...I think the community of London has changed and things change all the time, and yeah it is very different from when I was younger. I love being part of a circus family and I like that we stay together. If you're just a couple traveling all over the world, sometimes it's very lonely because you've got to imagine, you're not just moving country, you're moving a complete community because a circus is a community. So you have to join a new community, but saying that, you tend to know hundreds of people and you always know somebody that knows somebody and generally you usually end up somewhere where you're related to somebody along the line as well.
Views: 10006 1000 Londoners
Neesha Robinson,  cheerleader for Crystal Palace Football Club - Londoner #61
 
03:10
Neesha has been a cheerleader with Crystal Palace since 2011. She performs weekly in front of 17,000 people. Neesha is extremely ambitious. She dances at various events like Twickenham and entered Miss England. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: So I've been a crystal for around three years now, and this is actually my forth kit- so 4 seasons. It's been part of me so we grow as a bond, we're a family, we just... we can talk to any of the girls about anything so it's just amazing, I love it. I'm pretty sure there's like stereotypes which are attached to cheerleading but as you've seen we're all approachable we'll all talk to you. I think a lot of fans are like really scared to talk to us sometimes but we're not scary at all, like if anything I'm probably scared of like anyone else. Outside of being a crystal I'm a manager at an after-school club. Entertaining crystal palace fans is somewhat similar to entertaining, you know, the kids where I work because you need bundles of energy and you just need that spirit about you so I think it's quite similar in a weird kind of way. We're there to cheer on the fans, we're there to cheer on the team, and we've all got that in our hearts. My favourite part of a day, a match day, is just going out and that atmosphere is crazy- I love it, because everyone's a family, everyone's together, everyone's one- and we all want the same thing so it's really good.
Views: 12076 1000 Londoners
Canon Andrew White, The Vicar of Baghdad who fights for peace in the Middle East, Londoner #75
 
03:09
Canon Andrew White is a unique Londoner. Known as "the Vicar of Baghdad", he is the only Anglican vicar in Iraq's capital, heavily involved in reconciliation and peacekeeping work in this war-torn region, particularly between Sunni and Shiite muslims. Having served congregations across the capital for many years, he considers London close to his heart. We catch him on one of his rare trips to London, an opportunity for him to continue his reconciliation work from the UK. Andrew suffers from multiple sclerosis, which slurs his speech, but his courage transcends this.
Views: 5642 1000 Londoners
Manager of 24 hour international food shop dreams of owning his own business: Khan, Londoner #137
 
03:18
Khans run the Food Inn, a 24 hour cornershop. The cornershop offers various products from different cultures and countries such as Poland, Bulgaria and even Nigeria. Khan tells us about working in the shop and his dreams of owning his own business. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: I have Polish, Bulgarian, English, Slovakian, that one Italian, Turkish, Tunisian. That one is English Jam, this is a Turkish jam, this is a Polish jam. That one is Polish. It's German. You can see the Polish line, you can see the Bulgarian line, is the difference. I can sell Nigerian tea as well. No one is selling like this - Tesco, Asda, Iceland. That's why people do come to buy here. Everyone like to his country's product. I'm the store manager in the shop. I do business management, you know, my diploma. I know how to grow up the business. You try to make customer happy as well, how you meet to customer, that's very important. When customer is happy with you, he's coming to regular with you. 'You need help?' 'Hello Sir.' 'Wagwan...good yeah?' He's my regular customer, I know him 5 years. [Russian] 'Where are you from?' 'Where am I from? Ukraine' 'Ukraine? Ah you speak Russian' I can decide what I want to hear, like it's my own store, you know? My boss is happy with what I decide, he never say 'Why?'. I grow up in my country, in Pakistan, you know? Now I'm 30 years old. And when I came here, it's 24. I came to help my brother, he study here when he came, he 16 years. We meet with, first time, with the Facebook, you know? I just sent request, with the fun, you know? 'And is she from Pakistan?' No, she's Russian. She say 'I don't speak so much English.' I say 'Okay, I translate – I use Google Translate.' After she speak slowly, slowly, she give me her number, and we can speak everyday, half an hour, after we meet. After so long time, everyday we meet, and after, we decide to go married. 'And how long was that period?' Ah it's like...9 months. You know, I have future in the plan. I will try to open my own business. I think small with the big. I hope so, maybe I grow up more, more, more. I don't know, no one knows after what's going on, but I have planned my mind like this. We can open supermarket, for the big, me and my wife and my brother. We will work together.
Views: 3864 1000 Londoners
Ken Livingstone, Former Mayor of London - Londoner #17
 
03:12
Ken Livingstone has been central to London politics for the best part of four decades. However, since the last mayoral election he has largely retired from public life. What is he doing now? This new short film is a portrait of the former mayor in his retirement. It is filmed at his family home in North London where he tends to his garden, planting wild strawberries. Now a self-confessed house husband, Ken spends much of time time looking after his children and caring for his neighbours with politics taking up a much smaller part of his life. In the course of the documentary, he reflects on his relationship with Tony Blair ("we just don't talk about the war"), the state of the city now, and the impact that his generation had on London. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: People who live in London that believe what they read in the paper are all convinced I'm just a lying, stealing, anti-semitic tax-dodger, you know. Not much you can do about that when we don't have a free press. I mean 70% of all the papers we read are owned by four billionaires, all of them tax exiles and they're clearly not going to give a favourable sort of coverage to me are they? I just loved gardening, I mean, months would go by when I was mad I couldn't get in the garden. I've done more gardening in the last 18 months than I've done in my lifetime. These are just wild straws, they provide good ground cover. We didn't get a garden until I was twelve and, you know, so yeah. I think my mum gave me a little bout I used to grow onions in. I've lived in this house 25 years, I know my neighbours. One of my neighbours is disabled, I do his shopping and things like that. We're part of a local community. It's very much the good sort of side of the London I grew up in. That's what makes the city really work, it's not the great big olympic stadiums and all that, it's just the relationships between people. My wife, like me, dropped out of school, didn't go to university. She's now in her final year at uni so I do the house husbanding, I do the shopping, take the kids to school, take them out at the weekends so she's got a quiet house to work in, things like that. Walk the dog. I mean, I've just done my life the wrong way round, you know. I'm still on Labour's NEC, and still do quite a lot of meetings with the Labour party, fundraisers, things like that. We're the generation that had the best life of any humans in history, we were given everything. Education was free, you got state subsidies to help buy your own home. What our generation of politicians and bankers is leaving to the next generation is something much worse. Thing about Tony, he's always very polite and I'm pretty polite so we just don't talk about the war but you meet him now, he's a man who's totally haunted and it's not specifically about the war. It's the fact that he knows he could have done so much more. I think perhaps one of the greatest crimes of the Thatcher era was stopping building council housing and we're now living with the consequences of that. You go out to somewhere like Newham. I went out there with the major of Newham, we went up on the roof and you looked along and everyone's got a great big, sort of, breeze block shed in the back garden, you know it's family living in each one and it's squalid.
Views: 2197 1000 Londoners
Philip Child, who is the last in a family of tailors, dating back to the 19th Century - Londoner #70
 
03:23
Philip is a 5th generation tailor. His family owned tailor shop W.G. Child & Sons has been based in Wandsworth for over 100 years. Born into a family of tailors he decided to become one himself, and trained at the London College of Fashion. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: Because I'd always been living in and around the business, I sort of guess I might've always had an inkling I'd end up down here. I was never forced into it which is a good thing, my father never said well - it's a family business, you're the next one you know you're gonna have to do it, which is good. But I got to a point towards the end of my schooling when I was coming down and doing some work for pocket money and I just felt that I could probably do this. So once I decided I wanted to do it, then the pressure was on a bit, it also went hand in hand with the idea that well if you're going to learn to be a tailor you're going to be a tailor in the family business. At the time I started there were 3 of us here - my father and my grandfather and my self, so you've got 3 generations obviously which is pretty unique and pretty cool. But yeah there was a bit of pressure for me to come down here, not massive, you know, it wasn't applied with a big "come on boy, get going get down here and do it" but yeah, I thought this is where I was gonna have to be so here I am - still. So I went off and did 3 years at London college of fashion so having lived all my life in Wandsworth, getting into college was a big eye opener you know, there was lots of diversity - different ethnic backgrounds, everybody was young because you're all sort of the same age which is cool but lots of different ideas. I was based over in Old Street but they also had another part of the college based in Oxford Circus, and at Oxford Circus you had design, beauty therapy, modelling - so all the good-looking women were over at Oxford Circus, I remember on one occasion there was a friend of mine who'd got passes to a night club and we walked out of Oxford Circus with about around about a dozen of these models all made up, looking stunning and we walked down Oxford street - just him, me and half a dozen models on our arms and everyone just stopped and we walked into this night club and just finished the place. It was just great great great. Really good for your ego, it was all good - yeah. It gives me a shiver thinking about it now. 5 generations is a good innings, I would’ve loved there to be a number 6 but when it came to my children's career I sort of decided that I would never force them to do this, if they showed any interest in this I would've encouraged them and said yep, you can do it if you want to and I'm happy with that - but it never happened so I'm the last one. Main thing is they're happy, they've got their own lives and I would want them to pursue their own lives and not feel I'd controlled them and forced them to take a route they weren't comfortable with. My old man was very happy I'll tell you now, he got to retire and say well there you go - it still carries on, my legacy continues so ... it'll be a sad day when I shut this place for the last time. I'm gonna miss it.
Views: 3156 1000 Londoners
Founder of Girl Biker Gang - Vicious C*** Motorcycle Club, Gemma Harrisson #123
 
03:07
Gemma is part of the all girl biker gang VCMC. She runs their shop in Limehouse, where they build custom bikes. The aim of VCMC is to get more women riding and building bikes. http://www.vcmclondon.com/ 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. 1000londoners.com youtube.com/1000londoners facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit chocolatefilms.com Transcript: The VCMC was born from a drunken night in the workshop. We kind of followed a lot of girl groups in the US that had been sort of forming gangs of some kind and we were like 'Yeah let's do it! Sod it, let's do it!' Only drunk people can come up with a name like we have. Vicious (cough) Motorcycle Club. Imagine telling that one to your Mum. Your first experience on a bike is always in Asda car park, on your friends motorbike and so we thought how do girls get a chance if their boyfriend or a close friend doesn't have a bike or if you don't have an opportunity but they'd love to ride so again that's kind of why it went forward into giving them a hand and trying to get them on a motorbike for the first time. Our whole thing has been about not being exclusive and you know, we ride small bikes but again it befits the city we live in, for us anyway. The same thing with our Instagram, we've never pretended that we're from a place we're not. There's a lot of girls that like live in like an Arizona or you know wherever and have all these amazing desert shots and we've just been like OK, let's show people where we live and the dirty workshop we hang out in and how gross we look after messing about with a bike all day and not pretending to be anything we're not. They have great scenery and we have this shit dump. It's insane that through social media you can find people that are so like you, it's bizarre really. Since I've kind of got into it I've made some incredible friends through it. Bikes for me are a bit way out of..., I mean I work in luxury fashion so I work with expensive things all day long and so biking has just opened up this other world for me that is very very different. Like a double life. People at work have never seen me in trainers, and people in the workshop have never seen me in heels. To be in a city like London and to do something unaffected where you kind of not feel like you're beating the system but you know, everything costs so much and everyone wants something from each other and everyone's up in each other's shit all the time and to be in a place where you can kind of come and hang out with your friends and for it to make you feel that great. At the end of it that's why we were like 'let's carry on doing it because this is just so much fun.'
Views: 5234 1000 Londoners
The man behind the world famous Southbank Second Hand Book Stall: Gareth, Londoner #139
 
02:19
If you’ve walked along the Southbank, you’ll have bumped into Gareth and his bookselling stands. Gareth take us through his easygoing approach to sales. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com Transcript: I dread the day that if this place ever closes down. I don't know what I'd do when it finally does close. I can't imagine working in an office, or anything like that. People tend to just come to us. It's more of a browsing place. So people just have a little look around, find something they want and then come over. It's very much a relaxed attitude we have around here. Things like secondhand markets and secondhand bookshops, they're kind of disappearing. There used to be a lot more than – well at least I think there were a lot more when I was growing up as a kid. And it's kind of a disappearing trade now, and I think it is because of things like Amazon and eBay that it's getting that way. I think people of my generation grew up with books, and that's what they know what to read. I think the next generation down, that will grow up with iPads and Kindles and stuff like that, they probably won't look to a book as their first choice. Obviously, different books come in and out of fashion.I mean, there's certain authors and certain books that always people want. Like, for instance, our most asked for book ever is George Orwell's '1984'. I don't think people are aware nowadays of books that are banned. I mean, obviously 'Spycatcher' was a big thing in the 80's. German tourists come over here and find a book about the Nazis, with a – you know, the Nazi symbol on it. And they'll tell us "We're not allowed to have these books in Germany." And they find it amazing that we sell them here. There's loads of people down, loads of tourists, everyone's all happy, friendly, the sun's out, trees are green.It's just a really nice place – you're outside in the sun, in summer, most people are kind of cooped up inside. Yeah, summer's the nicest time, and winter's the worst time. I guess – I mean if this market ever did close down, maybe that's what I would probably move into, is opening up an Amazon store and working out of a warehouse somewhere, or something but...Hopefully that day will never come because I do like it down here.
Views: 4939 1000 Londoners
I rose from drug addiction to winning the British Supermoto Championships - Jay Smith, Londoner #118
 
02:41
Jay is the current British Supermoto champion. We join Jay on the morning of the GB Supermoto at Lydden Hill, Kent. We follow Jay as he gets prepared for the race and talks about his hopes and fears. He talks openly about his battle with drug addiction and the important role Supermoto plays on his road to recovery. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a five-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. 1000londoners.com youtube.com/1000londoners facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter: @1000_londoners Transcript: Today's the Round 7 of the British Championship. It's obviously a motorcycle sport which has got like all disciplines all in one, you know what I mean, so we've got like off road, we've got tarmac. We'll be on track at 9:30, have a good day! Yeah, well it's been a long road, you know what I mean I started in probably 2000 you know - so supermoto, I've done motocross as a kid, 6, 7, 8, 9 right up until I was about 18 and then we decided to give this a go. I got to about 25 and then I resorted to take a different path. The last four years has been the best four years of my life you know, really. Feeling alright? Yeah. Cool. Just chill. Enjoy, alright. I've done it for so many years, still get nervous you know, that's probably why we keep doing it. You can understand why I can't quit smoking now. I'm quite confident you know what I mean, all goes well, I reckon I can win today, why not. Everything I lost in my life back then I've sort of gained and more. You know what I mean you come from drug addiction to then back in the British Championship. If I wasn't clean, I would never have any of this, you know what I mean. I would probably be dead by now.
Views: 2172 1000 Londoners
Mike is a childminder - Londoner #260
 
03:07
10 years ago Mike quit his job as a graphic designer to become a full-time childminder. Being a man, his career choice is often met with stigma. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a ten-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter @1000_Londoners Instagram @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com TRANSCRIPT I'm a childminder, I've been doing it for 10 years. It started with my daughter and 10 years later here I am. Has everyone got a torch, Arthur have you got your torch? (child) Yes! (Mike) Let's have a look, hold on let's have a look in here. To give a child an opportunity to go out of their comfort zone - that's it, got it, I'm here with you, I'm not gonna let you fall - and trying to learn just a few life skills to see how much they can push themselves, without uhm, no falling (laughing) But also knowing that there's someone there to catch them if they do fall. We're not going past that tree that's fallen down there, you can hide up here… 12, 13, 14, 15 16 Oh I wonder, I just saw someone in a white shirt running right past us. running right past us. (whispering) We'll have to shift it. (children talking) (Mike) We can all go find Dilan, come on. (Mike laughing, sound of Mike and children running) I have faced discrimination, a lot. And it is when you're out with the children and people give you that look of: have you been left in charge of the children? 'Is mummy sick?' is another one. I was actually told by a person: men can't be childminders. It will wind you up and and then it kinda upsets you for the rest of the day but you feel stronger about it because then you tell the children that if, you know, you try and teach them your beliefs of what makes you strong. I don't know what would've happened if I'd stayed as a, working the 9 till 5. But I can guarantee you that I wouldn't have been as happy as I am now. At the end when a child leaves me I give them a book. I can't help but I get teary-eyed every time I put these books together because it's there's so many moments that I can go: yeah, you know, I was part of that, I remember that and how much they enjoyed that moment. It's an amazing thing to watch life through a child's eyes. For anyone, even if you're not a parent just to watch a child for a, and watch a child learn is, yeah it's pretty awesome.
Views: 1437 1000 Londoners
Christopher is the voice of Denmark Hill Station - Londoner #297
 
03:12
Christopher is a Customer Services Assistant at Denmark Hill Station, Camberwell. Meet a man passionate about the railways, consulted and trusted by travellers aplenty. 1000 LONDONERS This film is part of 1000 Londoners, a ten-year digital project which aims to create a digital portrait of a city through 1000 of the people who identify themselves with it. The profile contains a 3 minute film that gives an insight into the life of the Londoner, as well as their personal photos of London and some answers to crucial questions about their views on London life. Over the course of the project we aim to reveal as many facets of the capital as possible, seeing city life from 1000 points of view. www.1000londoners.com www.youtube.com/1000londoners www.facebook.com/1000londoners Twitter @1000_Londoners Instagram @1000_londoners 1000 Londoners is produced by South London based film production company and social enterprise, Chocolate Films. The filmmakers from Chocolate Films will be both producing the films and providing opportunities to young people and community groups to make their own short documentaries, which will contribute to the 1000 films. Visit www.chocolatefilms.com TRANSCRIPT Train arriving on platform 4 is the 10:44 Southeastern service to Dover Priory, calling at Bromley South, St Mary Cray, Swanley, Farningham Road, Longfield, Meopham, Sole Street, Rochester, Chatham, Gillingham, Rainham, Sittingbourne, Faversham, Canterbury East and Dover Priory. Customers for Bickley, Petworth and Orpington should take this train on platform 4, change at Bromley South for Bickley, Petworth and Orpington. The first journey I ever remember making by rail was to Kent, Broadstairs, from Bromley South on steam trains. And I suppose that was quite an adventure. I remember the first time somebody gave me a timetable in 1955 and I was eight. And I remember spending more time on this on this 1 shilling booklet than all the other presents. Could you just move to your right a bit, please? We need the handrail, thank you. Handrail is on your right now. And then we just go downstairs. It's a nice day, it's sharp but it's a good day to be out. (Woman shouting) What?! I've never been delayed for more than 2 minutes! (Christopher) The Clapham Junction train probably not delayed, it's a fault on the screen. That happens on every train and I think you will find it will go around in a minute. And just come 'round the left, Youssef. There was only once 1 person really rude and it does happen here and it spoils your day. I do find the abuse that we get when trains, particularly when trains go wrong is very very difficult to cope with. The abuse is directed more to people, I think the ticket office get it particularly badly although they… they also on the gates, I think they get more abuse directed to them than I do. Train arriving on platform 2 is the 10:48 Southeastern service to Dartford. Platform 2 for Peckham Rye, Nunhead, Lewisham, Blackheath, Kidbrooke, Eltham, Falconwood, Welling, Bexleyheath, Barnehurst and Dartford. Train arriving on platform 2, train to Dartford for stations to Northfleet, Greenhithe, Gravesend, Higham and Strood. The next stop on this train is Peckham Rye.
Views: 7077 1000 Londoners