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Francis Bacon & His Prose Style
 
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Sanjay Chawla Lecturer- English, Govt. Sanskrit College, Bonli
Views: 57941 vmouonline
Francis Bacon  : style & technique of writing | with notes | explained in hindi & english
 
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Hey guys ! This video explains in great detail the techniques used by Bacon in writing his essays. The notes are made and explained point wise , making it easier for you to learn and understand . Facebook page : https://m.facebook.com/Swarnshikha28
Joseph Addison prose style part 1
 
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Joseph Addison prose style part 1 english literature M A and B A English literature ugc net english joseph Addison as a prose writer.
18 Writing Hacks for Stronger Prose
 
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Website: http://www.shaelinbishop.com Tumblr: https://shaelinwrites.tumblr.com Ask me anything: http://shaelinwrites.tumblr.com/ask Twitter: @shaelinbishop
Views: 54703 ShaelinWrites
Linguistics, Style and Writing in the 21st Century - with Steven Pinker
 
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Does writing well matter in an age of instant communication? Drawing on the latest research in linguistics and cognitive science, Steven Pinker replaces the recycled dogma of style guides with reason and evidence. Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe Watch the Q&A here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rYAnYXIhL0 In this brand-new talk, introduced by Lord Melvyn Bragg, Steven argues that style still matters: in communicating effectively, in enhancing the spread of ideas, in earning a reader’s trust and, not least, in adding beauty to the world. Steven Pinker is an experimental psychologist and one of the world’s foremost writers on language, mind, and human nature. He is Professor in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University and conducts research on language and cognition but also writes for publications such as the New York Times, Time, and is the author of many books, including The Language Instinct and How the Mind Works. Melvyn Bragg is a broadcaster, writer and novelist. He was made a Life Peer (Lord Bragg of Wigton) in 1998. Since then he has hosted over 660 episodes of In Our Time on subjects ranging from Quantum Gravity to Truth. He was presenter of the BBC radio series The Routes of English, a history of the English language. He is currently Chancellor of the University of Leeds Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe The Ri is on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution and Tumblr: http://ri-science.tumblr.com/ Our editorial policy: http://www.rigb.org/home/editorial-policy Subscribe for the latest science videos: http://bit.ly/RiNewsletter
Views: 497983 The Royal Institution
Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World (4/5)
 
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View the FULL LIST of videos in this tutorial series for FREE: http://criticalthinkeracademy.com/courses/a-essays Learn how you can support the Critical Thinker Academy and access bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/KevindeLaplante TABLE OF CONTENTS (Over FOUR HOURS of video) 1. WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS IMPORTANT? Why Good Writers Rule the World 2. WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure 3. HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing to PRESENT vs Writing to DISCOVER Why Rewriting is Important (and why students don’t think so) How to Deal With Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block 4. WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using SCRIVENER A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template 5. FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part 1: The Assignment Part 2: Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References 6. HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The #1 Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style, and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style, and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing
Views: 1851 Kevin deLaplante
Swift's Prose Style-in English with Urdu/Hindi Explanation
 
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A.A. “Style is not an ornament, it is not an exercise. It is the sense of one’s own self the knowledge of what one wants to say and the saying of it in the most fitting words.” Qualities of Swift Style: 1.Plain and downright 2. Simple 3. Imitates various style 4.Swift un suppressed for his approach to the art 5. Lack of Imagination #SwiftsProseStyle #JohnthonSwift Characteristics of Language in English https://youtu.be/YYRYELr33H0 Place and Manner Of Articulation https://youtu.be/T41YfLwfyBc Chaucer's Art of Characterization https://youtu.be/MoTdek1O7cw Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Fundamentals-av-Linguistic-2004349273189520/?ref=bookmarks Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/u/0/106534537368366814538 Instagram:/www.instagram.com/jadwakhan/ Blogger:fundamentalsavlinguistic.blogspot.com
The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century
 
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Why is so much writing so bad, and how can we make it better? Is the English language being corrupted by texting and social media? Do the kids today even care about good writing? Why should any of us care? In The Sense of Style, the bestselling linguist and cognitive scientist Steven Pinker answers these questions and more. Rethinking the usage guide for the twenty-first century, Pinker doesn�t carp about the decline of language or recycle pet peeves from the rulebooks of a century ago. Instead, he applies insights from the sciences of language and mind to the challenge of crafting clear, coherent, and stylish prose. In this short, cheerful, and eminently practical book, Pinker shows how writing depends on imagination, empathy, coherence, grammatical knowhow, and an ability to savor and reverse engineer the good prose of others. He replaces dogma about usage with reason and evidence, allowing writers and editors to apply the guidelines judiciously, rather than robotically, being mindful of what they are designed to accomplish. Filled with examples of great and gruesome prose, Pinker shows us how the art of writing can be a form of pleasurable mastery and a fascinating intellectual topic in its own right.
Views: 3884 Microsoft Research
Poets v. Prose Writers
 
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Edward Hirsch had too much adrenaline to construct stories.
Views: 30752 Big Think
Prose writing style: simplicity and accuracy (tip 9)
 
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‘The best rule for writing – as well as for speaking – is to use always the simplest words that will accurately convey your thought.’ – David Lambuth, The Golden Book of Writing (The thumbnail image for this video is a photograph by Eric Wienke. It is covered by a Creative Commons license, and you can find more of his work here: https://www.flickr.com/people/illuminaut/)
Views: 3179 Online writing tips
Sentence Structure: How to Write a Memorable Sentence І The Great Courses
 
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You explore the myriad ways in which we think about, talk about, and write sentences. You discover insights into what makes for pleasurable reading. You also learn how you can apply these methods to your own writing. Try a Free Trial of The Great Courses Plus and watch Building Great Sentences: Exploring the Writer's Craft here: https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/show/building_great_sentences_exploring_the_writers_craft?utm_source=US_OnlineVideo&utm_medium=SocialMediaEditorialYouTube&utm_campaign=136230 Recently, I asked the students in my Prose Style class to think of memorable first sentences from novels. The results were actually a little disappointing, as almost everyone in the class came up with the same two or three first sentences, but only a couple of students could think of more than that. Of course, "Call me Ishmael" made almost everyone's list. "This is the saddest story I have ever heard," the very revealing sentence with which John Dowell opens Ford Maddox Ford's The Good Soldier popped up on several lists. Not surprisingly, the one opening line everyone in the class remembered was "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times," that supremely balanced sentence that begins A Tale of Two Cities. Dickens made that opening so memorable by exploiting in just a few words almost all the strategies of syntactic balance: "It was the" before the comma is mirrored by "it was the" after the comma, and the fact that each clause starts with the same words exploits the classical rhetorical trope of anaphora. The first clause ends with "times," as does the second clause, exploiting the classical rhetorical trope of epistrophe, and that both first and last words of these two clauses are the same makes it an example of yet another rhetorical trope, symploce. The only difference between the first clause and the second clause is that the word best before the comma is changed to worst after the comma, creating a simple but effective antithesis. It's hard to imagine a more perfectly balanced sentence! What my students did not remember is that "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times" is not the first sentence of A Tale of Two Cities but is instead only the first of a string of balanced clauses and conceptual balances that combine to form a first sentence that keeps on going for 118 words. And Dickens doesn't stop there, following this superbly balanced long sentence with even more balances. There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever. Dickens balances the English king with a large jaw against the French king with a large jaw, the English queen with a plain face against the French queen with a fair face, the throne of England against the throne of France. Then in the next sentence, he exploits the duple rhythm of clearer than crystal and the pairing of loaves and fishes and creates a subtle parallel between the three-word phrase things in genera" and the three-word phrase settled for ever. One can almost imagine Dickens performing these sentences, emphasizing their on the one hand/on the other hand structure with the regularity of a metronome: this/that, this/that, this/that. What makes this famous opening of Dickens's novel so memorable is variously referred to as its balanced form, or its extended parallelism. These two concepts exist in a kind of chicken-and-egg relationship: either balance is the heart of parallelism or parallelism is the heart of balance. It is easy to specify what makes a formally balanced sentence: A balanced sentence hinges in the middle, usually split by a semicolon, the second half of the sentence paralleling the first half, but changing one or two key words or altering word order. Dickens's first sentence in A Tale of Two Cities doesn't exactly fit the bill for a formally balanced sentence, but each of its seven initial paired clauses could, reminding us that sometimes a comma does the work of a semicolon in these constructions. But, while this sentence strings together a sequence of parallel balances, there are so many of them that we become more focused on the sentence's parallels than on each of its binary oppositions. Don’t forget to subscribe to our channel – we are adding new videos all the time! https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=TheGreatCourses
Views: 77464 The Great Courses Plus
The #1 Misconception About Writing Style (1/5)
 
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View the FULL LIST of videos in this tutorial series for FREE: http://criticalthinkeracademy.com/courses/a-essays Learn how you can support the Critical Thinker Academy and access bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/KevindeLaplante TABLE OF CONTENTS (Over FOUR HOURS of video) 1. WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS IMPORTANT? Why Good Writers Rule the World 2. WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure 3. HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing to PRESENT vs Writing to DISCOVER Why Rewriting is Important (and why students don’t think so) How to Deal With Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block 4. WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using SCRIVENER A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template 5. FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part 1: The Assignment Part 2: Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References 6. HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The #1 Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style, and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style, and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing
Views: 1813 Kevin deLaplante
Improve your Writing: Show, Not Tell
 
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Become a better writer, no matter what you're writing! I'll show you how to take simple, boring sentences and turn them to vibrant, expressive writing. As you practice this technique in your writing, you will find it carries over to your everyday spoken English as well. Before you know it, you'll be a more dynamic, compelling speaker and writer. Next, watch this video to improve your vocabulary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxjsWwgPjwM Take the quiz on this lesson at: https://www.engvid.com/english-writing-show-not-tell/ TRANSCRIPT Welcome back to engVid. Here we are with a writing lesson. We are looking at the skill of showing, not telling, and it's going to transform your writing as long as you put it into practice afterwards. "Show, not tell. What's he talking about?" When we're writing we want to avoid simple statements that don't really add any description or flavour. For example: "The man was stressed." [Snores] Boring. Instead, I want you to paint a picture, I really want you to describe the man is stressed without telling me that he is. So how can you do that? We're kind of trying to avoid this word, and describe it instead. So what's he doing? "The man was fidgeting. Ah, he's fidgeting. He's so stressed, he can't sort of stay still. And biting his nails." Okay? So pick out a couple of details that show how the person was. Next one: "The room was messy." Again, it's a simple, simple sentence. It's just one sort of main clause and it's not very interesting. Much better to describe the items in the room that make it messy. For example: "There was a leftover pizza, dirty clothes were strewn"... I'll write that word for you. That means they were covering the floor. "...and there were dirty plates and cups". Okay? These details give us the idea that it is messy. Example three: "The woman was confident." Okay, but it would be much more effective if you described how she was confident. So, how does she move? How do other people react to her? "She strode", that means she walked, but with purpose. Okay? So I've picked an interesting verb. "She strode into the room, and everyone turned their heads to notice her." Okay? Much clearer, more vivid idea of confidence than just saying she was confident. Example four: "The boy was careful." Tell us how he was careful. "He placed his favourite magazine in the top drawer of his cabinet." Okay? So we need to say exactly what he is placing, the object there has been missed out. "He placed"... There's no room for me to write it. You get the idea, he places his favourite book or magazine, and look how specific it is: "the top drawer of his cabinet". Next example: "The stadium was full." Again, I'm bored with this simple sentence construction. We need to make it more interesting. "The sound from the stadium was deafening", okay? And then give us some main action perhaps: "The sound from the stadium was deafening as the crowd rose up to chant the player's name." Okay? Give the sense that the stadium is full from what you can see and what you can hear. Okay? A couple of ones to describe weather. "It was hot." Okay? Well, a very young child could write a sentence like that, so if you're sort of a teenager or an adult, it's time to raise the bar. How can we tell that it is hot? Well: "The sun was causing damage to", "The sun was melting", "The sun was burning", "The sun was causing the lady's skin to turn red". Okay? Pick out details that show the effect. "It was cold. It was cold." How do we know it was cold? How cold did it feel? What can you see? "Drainpipes were freezing, ice was as thick as"... I don't know. "It was three inches thick." Whatever, you've got to show details rather than just stating things. -"It was windy." -"The umbrella was totally bent out of shape. The umbrella"-you know for keeping the rain off us-"was totally"-that means fully-"bent"-Yeah? Bent-"...out of shape", out of its normal position. "He found it funny." Right? How funny did he find it? Okay? Better to... For us to get the idea to picture what he was doing: "He was rolling around the floor in hysterics." Okay? When you're so... Find something so funny, you're like: [Laughs]. Okay? He can't control his body he finds it so funny. "Hysterics", that means like totally lost control. "Hysteria". Okay? Hysterics. "In hysterics" means finding something really, really funny. "The castle was captured." Right. I want to get a sense of drama. I want to imagine what's happening there at the castle. Is the king having his head cut off? Are the new army marching in? What's happening? "The new flag was hoisted up on high, greeted by a cheer from the crowd." Okay? Paint pictures, pick out details. Okay? It's good to have a range of adjectives, but how can you show those adjectives? How can you describe them instead? Thank you for watching today's video. Have a go at the quiz after this, and I'll see you very soon. Remember to subscribe. Bye.
Write Like Hemingway
 
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In this video essay, learn how famous American author, Ernest Hemingway, honed his writing style and what made it so unique by examining his novel, A Farewell to Arms. Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/entertaintheelk Instagram - @adamtinius Twitter - @EntertainTheElk Website - www.entertaintheelk.com MUSIC IN THIS VIDEO: "Black Heat" by Ross Bugden - Music is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mhqnK65AZmM "Oxygen Garden" by Chris Zabriskie Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XfSDpchqV4
Views: 36388 Entertain The Elk
Practical Style, Reflexive Style, and Academic Style (3/5)
 
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View the FULL LIST of videos in this tutorial series for FREE: http://criticalthinkeracademy.com/courses/a-essays Learn how you can support the Critical Thinker Academy and access bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/KevindeLaplante TABLE OF CONTENTS (Over FOUR HOURS of video) 1. WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS IMPORTANT? Why Good Writers Rule the World 2. WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure 3. HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing to PRESENT vs Writing to DISCOVER Why Rewriting is Important (and why students don’t think so) How to Deal With Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block 4. WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using SCRIVENER A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template 5. FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part 1: The Assignment Part 2: Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References 6. HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The #1 Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style, and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style, and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing
Views: 2101 Kevin deLaplante
Hemingway's Four Amazing Rules for Writing
 
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VelocityWriting.com - Ernest Hemingway ultimately shot himself. While he lived he was probably the greatest author in the 20th century. He had 4 BIG rules for writing and I share them here along with my own commentary. ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ LIKE THIS VIDEO? - Please Like and Comment! Share this video ➜ https://youtu.be/sbGO2TjVP6Q ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ FREE EBOOK FOR YOU ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ "7 Tested Money-Making Methods for Writers" Get it here: https://goo.gl/5PdpcS Limited offer - This or an alternative Free eBook will always be available for you. ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ GET HELP WITH YOUR BOOK ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Discover my Personalized Author Services. See what I do and my affordable fees here ➜ https://goo.gl/n2oaV9 ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ HOW TO JOIN THE FUN ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ✔ Subscribe to this YouTube Channel ➜ https://goo.gl/JajRjN Also click on the Bell Symbol to get instant update notifications ✔ Like VelocityWriting on Facebook ➜ https://goo.gl/2G1sOf ✔ Follow VelocityWriting on Twitter ➜ https://goo.gl/97BW ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ QUESTIONS PEOPLE ASK ME ALL THE TIME ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Q. Have you written any books? Sure. Dozens of them. I write them under D.L. Hughes and pseudonyms. Also, I have ghostwritten books for others for decades. I still write about 5,000 words each day, but much of it is aimed at online courses I offer. Also, I have written literally thousands of news stories, magazine articles and blog posts. You can see my full pedigree here ➜ https://goo.gl/Cdc49U Q. Do you ever read and evaluate unpublished manuscripts? Yes, I have been helping new writers for decades. I found I could help many more by offering online courses and this YouTube Channel. However, if you want to learn more about my personalized author services, please see what I do and my fees here ➜ https://goo.gl/n2oaV9 ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ COME AND HANG OUT ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ "Write Your Vision at the Speed of Life." That's the VelocityWriting.com slogan. But it's FAR more than a slogan. It's a philosophy that recognizes that life passes quickly and that writing is a way for us all to make a lasting impact on our world. Visit VelocityWriting.com today.
Views: 34376 VelocityWriting
How to Build Your Writing Vocabulary
 
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Great writers equip themselves with an arsenal of words. An expansive vocabulary allows one to capture precise images and emotions, but there’s no need to resort to purple prose. Here, you’ll find tips for building your vocabulary while striking a balance between rare and common words. My Professional Editing Services: https://www.quotidianwriter.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/QuotidianWriter Title and End Music: “Clockwork” by Vindsvept - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Zl4EGLoiI8 Background Music: Podington Bear
Views: 8172 Diane Callahan
Hemingway's Writing Style and Voice: The 10-Point Discussion
 
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Heay! Josh here, welcome to the WriteRightRite (: All literary critics understand that Hemingway as a minimalist writer, and that his style — his voice was one of the most unique writing styles of the time, and still is. But our question is, how can I write like him? How do I find the voice and style of the minimalist writer, like Hemingway? This list of 10 ways Hemingway wrote like a minimalist should point us in the right direction. 1. The "Hard Boiled" Style Hemingway wrote in a masculine, scientific, and at times rigid and abrupt way... 2. Be Efficient Hemingway despised superfluous literature... 3. Write the Truth "All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know." 4. Find Solitude "Although far from a recluse, Hemingway always wrote in solitude or near solitude when conditions didn't allow. In A Moveable Feast he recalls the cold of his room, warmed by sticks in the winter: "It was either six or eight flights up to the top floor and it was very cold and I knew how much it cost for a bundle of small twigs, to make a fire that would warm the room." 5. Write Standing up In 1958 a reporter named George Plimpton interviewed Hemingway. He writes: "A working habit he has had from the beginning, Hemingway stands when he writes. He stands in a pair of his oversized loafers on the worn skin of a lesser kudu -- the typewriter and the reading board chest-high opposite him." 6. Find a Secret Writing Place This is not just a place of solitude, but a different place than your normal haunts. 7. Write With Pencil and Paper It's not everyone's forte, especially in the modern world of laptops and wi-fi. But this was Ernest Hemingway's way. 8. Short Sentences Are Successful Hemingway was once challenged to write a story using only 6 words. He wrote: "For sale: baby shoes, never used." 9. Use Language Aggressively That doesn't mean cuss every other word, although at times Hemingway did that too. The more energetically forceful words are, the less need there is for more of them. Consider these 10. Keep the Good, Trash the Bad In 1934, Hemingway told F. Scott Fitzgerald: "I write one page of masterpiece to ninety-one pages of sh**. I try to put the sh** in the wastebasket." -Josh Photos by: Thanks for the great photos! - Marie-Lan Nguyen http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boiled_egg#mediaviewer/File:Egg_spiral_egg_cup.jpg Janet Ramsden https://www.flickr.com/photos/ramsd/11075130845/in/photolist-7anDgu-aAvh9L-jvULdT-9YdeZ4-iae6-jVhfXr-4jRfvE-54yxHY-5osiWk-mAGz83-6Ewshz-hSEWxP-da4Pmd-kx2b3k-5U3ihF-6nzWoW-nazkHt-7F8ukc-jmNcZi-iKqkQc-bo1UfR-fMfTmm-doH1wo-nmpsYt-6y65Ha-6y5UsB-7hFHDj-cKczVA-9SBogZ-fKhf8J-dXXEdW-d1pogh-fK1FYo-4NFgXf-7EVvgf-6MWhZA-mjqpwg-a55puw-B78H8-6tERqT-RC5ZR-tRTwU-5DeHyu-9GJP3P-61sd5t-jGvqiG-6RFNzH-6pkj4W-2Vb39b-sCTj Improvana http://improvana.tumblr.com/ Geraint Rowland https://www.flickr.com/photos/geezaweezer/13519812124/in/photolist-7anDgu-aAvh9L-jvULdT-9YdeZ4-iae6-jVhfXr-4jRfvE-54yxHY-5osiWk-mAGz83-6Ewshz-hSEWxP-da4Pmd-kx2b3k-5U3ihF-6nzWoW-nazkHt-7F8ukc-jmNcZi-iKqkQc-bo1UfR-fMfTmm-doH1wo-nmpsYt-6y65Ha-6y5UsB-7hFHDj-cKczVA-9SBogZ-fKhf8J-dXXEdW-d1pogh-fK1FYo-4NFgXf-7EVvgf-6MWhZA-mjqpwg-a55puw-B78H8-6tERqT-RC5ZR-tRTwU-5DeHyu-9GJP3P-61sd5t-jGvqiG-6RFNzH-6pkj4W-2Vb39b-sCTj Tobias Vemmenby https://www.flickr.com/photos/toobydoo/11350433966/in/photolist-hyH1UN-cResdL-6fWNYP-9aXQzK-6YEhtv-fhCMtq-jUqYE-4uLWG6-4MfCNH-7SyD2r-cUv4i3-6YJjjy-4f2GNe-btBcgy-cXfuvm-8uAuod-ihZWzm-84G99h-8gVDyg-jg1yUu-9EwYzB Laura Ritchie https://www.flickr.com/photos/lauraritchie/7874958188/in/photolist-cZTdHb-b3JagT-5b7m8i-7GHQjM-6iriP7-74kT37-iTBuer-aafHex-fUw3tp-b18J7g-8FDhnK-atwsgk-73EYvL-dVr5uX-963van-9vNiDT-9vZQbU-6CAqjw-6tbFKY-8kCy1P-6KDN3R-aNgqzX-7fw487-ax9Wxo-6FdyvF-8rEo7Q-ar28sq-ba2bue-b18FWx-6KDvJR-74gcCn-b18JHa-aubwL4-azLAn1-6w5iMm-jeNbbb-bifZjM-mmjP9P-8Z25y7-aiuSwC-613NTr-eetGE3-81uiaD-6zMFTc-6tbFU3-9WhLYe-6NjxHx-iAn97x-9TfHCw-8KffUP
Views: 17385 WriteRightRite
Mastering Style: The Learning and Teaching of Writing
 
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The Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching (HILT), in collaboration with the Harvard Writers at Work Lecture Series, welcomed Professor Steven Pinker and Visiting Professor Jill Abramson on December 9th, 2014 in a talk at Harvard titled, "Mastering Style: The Learning and Teaching of Writing." The discussion, inspired by the recent publication of Professor Pinker’s book, The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century, was focused on the teaching and learning of writing, associated challenges, and practical recommendations. The starting point of effective writing, Pinker shared, is for the author to determine a mental model of the communication scenario between the writer and the reader. Pinker shared the “classic style” theory of interpreting writer/reader communication from literary scholars Francis-Noel Thomas and Mark Turner. Classic style aims to help the reader see objective reality, which can be accomplished by focusing on the thing being shown and not on the activity of studying it, as well as by avoiding clichés and “metaconcepts” (concepts about concepts), among other recommendations. Academic writing, in contrast, is frequently written in postmodern or self-conscious style, one that includes apologizing and hedging.
Views: 41312 Harvard University
How to write using Classic Style
 
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Based on the first half of The Sense of Style by Steven Pinker. Here is the summary frame at 19:50: Start and finish strong. You have something important to say and you want to share that with the reader in conversation. Use the mind’s eye with concrete images. Insert a surprising word or two, and use words that sound as they mean. Start by jotting ideas down on cards and look for the links. Remember the rules: Light before heavy; Topic, then comment; Given then new. Take the reader on a journey, arrange ideas in a logical sequence, or tell a story with a narrative arc. Do not use: Meta-discourse, meta-concepts, very, hedge, clichés, passive voice, zombie nouns, It or There…, that, which, who, mixed-metaphors, jargon, latin. Open with a question, in other words, qualify, self-contained summary, pronouns, split sentences, therefore, moreover, however, for example, as in, such as, chunk. Use ordering schemes to connect your ideas. Are you showing resemblance, contiguity, cause and effect? Is there plausible negation and a sense of proportion. Are you consistent? Share your work. Return to it yourself. Read the passage aloud. Omit needless words. Paragraph breaks, taglines, pull quotes, and examples.
Views: 759 Ben Toettcher
The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide  to Writing in the 21st Century
 
02:09:41
WHY IS SO MUCH WRITING SO BAD, and how can we make it better? Is the English language being corrupted by texting and social media? Do people write badly on purpose, to obfuscate and impress? Have dictionaries abandoned their responsibility to safeguard correct usage? Do kids today even care about good writing? In his latest book the Harvard linguist, cognitive scientist, bestselling author (The Language Instinct, How the Mind Works, The Blank Slate, and The Better Angels of Our Nature) and chair of the Usage Panel of The American Heritage Dictionary, Dr. Steven Pinker, answers these questions and more. Pinker applies insights from the sciences of language and mind to the challenge of crafting clear, coherent, and stylish prose. Filled with examples of great and gruesome modern prose, The Sense of Style shows how the art of writing can be a form of pleasurable mastery and a fascinating intellectual topic in its own right, that is also informed by science. A book signing will follow the lecture. http://www.skeptic.com/upcoming-lectures/sense-of-style-writing-in-21st-century/
Views: 51150 Skeptic
How to write descriptively - Nalo Hopkinson
 
04:42
View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-to-write-fiction-that-comes-alive-nalo-hopkinson The point of fiction is to cast a spell, a momentary illusion that you are living in the world of the story. But as a writer, how do you suck your readers into your stories in this way? Nalo Hopkinson shares some tips for how to use language to make your fiction really come alive. Lesson by Nalo Hopkinson, animation by Enjoyanimation.
Views: 1779671 TED-Ed
Steven Pinker on bad and good writing
 
05:55
The psychologist and word-usage expert has produced a new style guide with cognitive sensibilities called "The Sense of Style". For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1uESjz9
Views: 31298 The Economist
Joseph Addison prose style part 2
 
03:03
Joseph Addison prose style part 2 english literature M A and B A English literature ugc net english joseph Addison as a prose writer with hindi translation.
Prose in the Victorian Age
 
25:04
Prof.Merin Simi Raj Dept. Of Humanities & Social Sciences IIT Madras
Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Academic Writing (5/5)
 
10:52
View the FULL LIST of videos in this tutorial series for FREE: http://criticalthinkeracademy.com/courses/a-essays Learn how you can support the Critical Thinker Academy and access bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/KevindeLaplante TABLE OF CONTENTS (Over FOUR HOURS of video) 1. WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS IMPORTANT? Why Good Writers Rule the World 2. WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure 3. HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing to PRESENT vs Writing to DISCOVER Why Rewriting is Important (and why students don’t think so) How to Deal With Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block 4. WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using SCRIVENER A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template 5. FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part 1: The Assignment Part 2: Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References 6. HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The #1 Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style, and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style, and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing
Views: 1400 Kevin deLaplante
Orwell on Writing : Clarity Is the Remedy
 
03:46
An NPR story by Lawrence Wright on why he recommends George Orwell's essay "Politics and the English Language".
Views: 12573 Carlos Barrera
Literary Genres and Subgenres (Fiction, Nonfiction, Drama, and Poetry) - Video and Worksheet
 
23:30
Literary Genres video notesheet: http://www.englishunits.com/wp-content/uploads/Literary-Genres-and-Subgenres-Video-Notes.pdf Literary Genres worksheets and quizzes: http://www.englishunits.com/genres/ This video and worksheet teaches literary genres of fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry, as well as subgenres of each. Learners see an example of each genre and subgenre and practice identifying the genre and subgenre of several descriptions, then check their responses. This video was created by a US public school teacher for use with ESOL students learning mainstream English curriculum. This video includes subtitles in English, Spanish, and Simplified Chinese, as well as auto-translate in many languages. To view the subtitles and transcript, follow these steps: 1) Click CC to turn on subtitles. 2) Click the settings icon (to the right of CC), and choose the language you need. 3) To view the transcript, click the three dots (...) below the video and to the right. Then, click Open Transcript, and choose the language. 4) Once the transcript is open, you can copy and paste it into Word or other documents.
Steven Pinker on Good Writing, with Ian McEwan
 
01:18:03
Want to join the debate? Check out the Intelligence Squared website to hear about future live events and podcasts: http://www.intelligencesquared.com __________________________ http://www.intelligencesquared.com/events/steven-pinker-ian-mcewan-good-writing/ Filmed at the Royal Geographical Society on 25th September 2014. Steven Pinker is one of the world’s leading authorities on language, mind and human nature. A professor of psychology at Harvard, he is the bestselling author of eight books and regularly appears in lists of the world’s top 100 thinkers. On September 25th 2014 he returned to the Intelligence Squared stage to discuss his latest publication 'The Sense of Style', a short and entertaining writing guide for the 21st century. Pinker will argue that bad writing can’t be blamed on the internet, or on “the kids today”. Good writing has always been hard: a performance requiring pretence, empathy, and a drive for coherence. He answered questions such as: how can we overcome the “curse of knowledge”, the difficulty in imagining what it’s like not to know something we do? And how can we distinguish the myths and superstitions about language from helpful rules that enhance clarity and grace? Pinker showed how everyone can improve their mastery of writing and their appreciation of the art. Professor Pinker was in conversation with Ian McEwan, one of Britain’s most acclaimed novelists, who has frequently explored the common ground between art and science.
Views: 201530 iqsquared
Hemingway's writing style explained
 
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Ernest Hemingway was a subject, verb, direct object kind of writer. His sentences were short and easy to read. His writing set a new style genre in literature. Bill Castanier of mittenlit.com share this information at "Ask The Experts" at the Friendship House MSU in East Lansing.
Views: 11567 wmmanfred
Workshop—Francine Prose: Words versus Ideas
 
01:39:53
How does a piece of writing start—with language or with an idea? What is most important to writers and to readers? What is the role of style, diction, word choice in what we write—and how we read? We will talk about all this—and more.
Views: 2188 PEN America
ROMANTIC AGE/MOVEMENT UGC NET/JRF/HTET CHARLES LAMB  English Literature  Prose BY :Deepak Bidhan
 
12:33
Essays on Elia (1823) -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- ALSO WATCH : "WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE'S | UGC NET/JRF ENGLISH By Deepak Bidhan" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0y_iTiKuAzA -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Why Good Writers Rule the World
 
11:59
View the FULL LIST of videos in this tutorial series for FREE: http://criticalthinkeracademy.com/courses/a-essays Learn how you can support the Critical Thinker Academy and access bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/KevindeLaplante TABLE OF CONTENTS (Over FOUR HOURS of video) 1. WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS IMPORTANT? Why Good Writers Rule the World 2. WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure 3. HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing to PRESENT vs Writing to DISCOVER Why Rewriting is Important (and why students don’t think so) How to Deal With Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block 4. WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using SCRIVENER A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template 5. FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part 1: The Assignment Part 2: Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References 6. HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The #1 Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style, and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style, and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing
Views: 7280 Kevin deLaplante
Betrand Russell.......MA ENG PROSE PART 2 BZU COURSE
 
07:16
Visit our facebook.com Facebook.com/PHD/MPHIL LINGUISTICS AND LITERATURE THE ESL ACADEMY BY SIRRANA
The Age of Milton : Prose & Poetry
 
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The Age of Milton : Prose & Poetry Prof.Merin Simi Raj Dept. Of Humanities & Social Sciences IIT Madras
√ How to Analyse Texts Critically - Critical Thinking - English
 
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#iitutor #English #CriticalThinking https://www.iitutor.com/ https://blog.gradeproof.com/need-more-inspiration-on-how-to-improve-your-writing/ Every Text Can Be Interpreted Every idea, theme and concept in a text is open for interpretation and its meaning can change. Don’t assume common knowledge, because even facts need to be proven. So, for that reason, you can choose to ignore more common analysis and come up with your own. Critical Analysis of Texts Texts can be analysed independently. There is no set consensus on how you should do it – only that you are able to justify the how and why in your argument. It requires breaking down a text and its key sections, a bit of note-taking, and for you to make clear distinctions. Construction of Story There is much to analyse in how a story is constructed. The way language and structure are used is important. It influences the meaning of the text. Think about how the form and style of an author affects how the text communicates. You should be looking for things such as: • medium • genre • style of prose/poetry • use of plot devices such as flashbacks, varied narrators and climax • formatting/editing • meaning • representation Language Visual and written language techniques are the simplest method you may use to interpret a text. You must think and analyse how and why they are used. You must constantly challenge the use of such techniques. look at how they contribute to meaning: • imagery, emotional and sensory language • metaphor • visual layout • camera and film techniques • dialogue • contrast, paradox and juxtaposition Characterisation Characterisation is an important consideration for critical analysis. By analysing how a character is portrayed, you can discuss their motives and purpose. This is not the same as describing a character. Characterisation can be indicated through description and dialogue, or through the ‘voice’ of the narrator. This is indicated through: • use of dialogue • description • character’s role (antagonist, protagonist, foil) • relationships • change in narration • language techniques and their effect on appearance Theme Theme is purely interpretive. Any theme you identify has to be justified and argued. Theme can be interpreted through a key idea or effect of a text. In other words, the theme is basically the predominant idea of what the text achieves through meaning. They can be ideas relating to: • philosophy/psychology • feelings • personal issues • political • social • cultural • religious/spiritual • life and its stages
Views: 37664 iitutor.com
Understanding Shakespeare
 
09:25
An essay exploring Shakespeare's unique writing style and how his influence has resonated throughout history. Patreon: www.patreon.com/entertaintheelk Twitter: @entertaintheelk Instagram: @adamtinius Website - www.entertaintheelk.com BOOKS IN THIS VIDEO: "The Norton Shakespeare", 2nd Edition: http://amzn.to/2rYBSo5 BBC Radio Presents: Romeo & Juliet FILMS IN THIS VIDEO: Hamlet (1990) Richard III (1955) Romeo and Juliet (1968) Romeo + Juliet (1996) Romeo & Juliet (2013) Shakespeare in Love MUSIC IN THIS VIDEO: Wolf by Joachim Heinrich is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-YCzVegoHA What If by Joachim Heinrich is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_AwmjqwFL5A Eyes Wide Open by Joachim Heinrich is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=POzdiQ6yevQ&t=3s I'm an Astronaut by Joachim Heinrich is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...) Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=reOrFSlLOEk
Views: 149814 Entertain The Elk
Teaching Hemingway: So Ugly, So Beautiful | Mark Ott | TEDxDeerfield
 
12:44
Dr. Ott compares Hemingway's carefully constructed public persona to the careful construction of Hemingway's prose. A true master of the topic, Mark Ott draws connections between Hemingway's style, Cezanne's paintings, and the idea that composition applies similarly to painting, writing, and life. Mark Ott is the author of A Sea of Change: Ernest Hemingway and the Gulf Stream, A Contextual Biography, co-editor of Ernest Hemingway and the Geography of Memory: New Perspectives and Hemingway in Italy: Twenty-First Century Perspectives. He is also the editor of the “Teaching Ernest Hemingway” series for Kent State University Press, and was the co-director of the XVI Biennial Ernest Hemingway Society Conference in Venice in 2014. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 29694 TEDx Talks
Margaret Atwood Teaches Creative Writing | Official Trailer | MasterClass
 
01:39
Learn more about Margaret Atwood's MasterClass at https://www.masterclass.com/ma In her first-ever online class, the author of the Handmaid's Tale teaches you her approach to crafting vivid prose and hooking readers with her timeless approach to storytelling. Margaret Atwood, arguably one of the world’s best fictional writers, is an award-winning and prolific author of more than fifty novels, books of poetry, and critical essays. Her 1985 dystopian novel, The Handmaid’s Tale, was adapted into the Emmy-winning TV series on Hulu, now in its second season, and was the best-selling book on Amazon in 2017. Atwood’s Booker Prize-nominated 1996 novel, Alias Grace, was also adapted to a TV series for Netflix. Her recent works include a book of short stories, Stone Mattress: Nine Tales; and the MaddAddam trilogy. Unrestricted by genre barriers, Atwood has explored nearly every form of writing – including comic books, with her 2016 superhero series Angel Catbird. In her MasterClass, Margaret Atwood will teach her process for writing speculative and historical fiction, and discuss novels based on dystopian societies. Students will learn techniques Atwood uses to keep readers engaged – how to developing compelling plots with complex structures, how to choose a narrative point of view, and how to create nuanced characters. The class will also give students a glimpse of Atwood’s research materials and the first handwritten draft of The Handmaid’s Tale, as well as the manuscript draft materials of Alias Grace. “Creativity is one of the most essential things about being human, Storytelling is very ancient; the novel is a more modern form of storytelling. Like every other creative endeavor, novel-writing is partly learn-by-doing. In my MasterClass, I’m happy to share how I wrote my stories, and my processes and tips, with people who want to write fiction themselves.”—Margaret Atwood In this online writing class, you’ll learn about: Crafting complex dystopias Structure and narrative Creating nuanced characters Speculative fiction Narrative point of view Crafting dialogue Prose style and texture More from MasterClass: James Patterson Teaches Writing: https://www.masterclass.com/jp Malcolm Gladwell Teaches Writing: https://www.masterclass.com/mg Judy Blume Teaches Writing: https://www.masterclass.com/jbl Unlock every class for a full year with the MasterClass All-Access Pass. Try the All-Access Pass free for a week: https://www.masterclass.com/all-access-pass Subscribe to the MasterClass channel on YouTube to get first access to exclusive content and new class announcements. About MasterClass MasterClass was founded on the idea that everyone should have "access to genius." The premier online education platform provides affordable, engaging, and inspirational online classes taught by world-renowned instructors, making it possible for anyone to learn from the best.
Views: 302430 MasterClass
What is CREATIVE NONFICTION? What does CREATIVE NONFICTION mean? CREATIVE NONFICTION meaning
 
09:59
✪✪✪✪✪ WORK FROM HOME! Looking for WORKERS for simple Internet data entry JOBS. $15-20 per hour. SIGN UP here - http://jobs.theaudiopedia.com ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is CREATIVE NONFICTION? What does CREATIVE NONFICTION mean? CREATIVE NONFICTION meaning - CREATIVE NONFICTION definition - CREATIVE NONFICTION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Creative nonfiction (also known as literary nonfiction or narrative nonfiction) is a genre of writing that uses literary styles and techniques to create factually accurate narratives. Creative nonfiction contrasts with other nonfiction, such as academic or technical writing or journalism, which is also rooted in accurate fact, but is not written to entertain based on writing style or florid prose. For a text to be considered creative nonfiction, it must be factually accurate, and written with attention to literary style and technique. "Ultimately, the primary goal of the creative nonfiction writer is to communicate information, just like a reporter, but to shape it in a way that reads like fiction." Forms within this genre include biography, autobiography, memoir, diary, travel writing, food writing, literary journalism, chronicle, personal essays and other hybridized essays. According to Vivian Gornick, "A memoir is a tale taken from life—that is, from actual, not imagined, occurrences—related by a first-person narrator who is undeniably the writer. Beyond these bare requirements it has the same responsibility as the novel or the short story: to shape a piece of experience so that it moves from a tale of private interest to one with meaning for the disinterested reader." Critic Chris Anderson claims that the genre can be understood best by splitting it into two subcategories—the personal essay and the journalistic essay—but the genre is currently defined by its lack of established conventions. Literary critic Barbara Lounsberry—in her book The Art of Fact—suggests four constitutive characteristics of the genre, the first of which is "Documentable subject matter chosen from the real world as opposed to 'invented' from the writer's mind." By this, she means that the topics and events discussed in the text verifiably exist in the natural world. The second characteristic is "Exhaustive research," which she claims allows writers "novel perspectives on their subjects" and "also permits them to establish the credibility of their narratives through verifiable references in their texts." The third characteristic that Lounsberry claims is crucial in defining the genre is "The scene". She stresses the importance of describing and revivifying the context of events in contrast to the typical journalistic style of objective reportage. The fourth and final feature she suggests is "Fine writing: a literary prose style". "Verifiable subject matter and exhaustive research guarantee the nonfiction side of literary nonfiction; the narrative form and structure disclose the writer’s artistry; and finally, its polished language reveals that the goal all along has been literature." Creative nonfiction may be structured like traditional fiction narratives, as is true of Fenton Johnson's story of love and loss, Geography of the Heart, and Virginia Holman's Rescuing Patty Hearst. When book-length works of creative nonfiction follow a story-like arc, they are sometimes called narrative nonfiction. Creative nonfiction often escapes traditional boundaries of narrative altogether, as happens in the bittersweet banter of Natalia Ginzburg's essay, "He and I", in John McPhee's hypnotic tour of Atlantic City, In Search of Marvin Gardens, and in Ander Monson's playful, experimental essays in Neck-Deep and Other Predicaments. Creative nonfiction writers have embraced new ways of forming their texts—including online technologies—because the genre leads itself to grand experimentation. Dozens of new journals have sprung up—both in print and online—that feature creative nonfiction prominently in their offerings. Writers of creative or narrative non-fiction often discuss the level, and limits, of creative invention in their works, and justify the approaches they have taken to relating true events. Melanie McGrath, whose book Silvertown, an account of her grandmother’s life, is "written in a novelist's idiom", writes in the follow-up, Hopping, that the known facts of her stories are "the canvas on to which I have embroidered. Some of the facts have slipped through the holes—we no longer know them nor have any means of verifying them—and in these cases I have reimagined scenes or reconstructed events in a way I believe reflects the essence of the scene or the event in the minds and hearts of the people who lived through it. ...
Views: 9315 The Audiopedia
ROMANTIC AGE/MOVEMENT UGC NET/JRF WILLIAM HAZLITT  English Literature  Prose BY :Deepak Bidhan
 
10:31
Contribution of William Hazlitt in Prose Style UGC NET,LT GRADE UP, DSSSB -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- ALSO WATCH : "WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE'S | UGC NET/JRF ENGLISH By Deepak Bidhan" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0y_iTiKuAzA -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
On Letter Writing by A.G.Gardiner
 
14:20
This video is based on essay of A.G Gardiner and in this essay On Letter Writing" he talks about the lost art of letter writing.Alpha of the plough was the pen name of A.G. Gardiner.A.G. Gardiner says that letter writing is not practised by many people now-a-days. They do not have the gift of self-expression. They are not able to condense the atmosphere into concrete word.
Views: 44622 DHEERAJ KUMAR SINGH
of studies by Francis Bacon explain in Hindi and English
 
16:58
of studies is an essay was written by Francis Bacon here he tells us that there are many advantages of study in our life it gives us pleasure and knowledge that is very important for our life and life decision Share and support us. Escholar 360 is all about education and entertainment, we are trying to make education easy for students as well as we are trying to give you healthy entertainment and inspirational videos, so keep touch with us, For subscribe our channel here https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3MKGiItBxSbP0r1VSTrpxA?sub_confirmation=1 #francisBacon #preodicEssay #Englishliterature #ofstudiy twitter https://twitter.com/afsar069 facebook https://www.facebook.com/Escholar360/
Views: 64550 Escholar 360
How to Deal with Writer's Anxiety and Writer's Block
 
10:55
View the FULL LIST of videos in this tutorial series for FREE: http://criticalthinkeracademy.com/courses/a-essays Learn how you can support the Critical Thinker Academy and access bonus content: https://www.patreon.com/KevindeLaplante TABLE OF CONTENTS (Over FOUR HOURS of video) 1. WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS IMPORTANT? Why Good Writers Rule the World 2. WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure 3. HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing to PRESENT vs Writing to DISCOVER Why Rewriting is Important (and why students don’t think so) How to Deal With Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block 4. WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using SCRIVENER A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template 5. FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part 1: The Assignment Part 2: Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References 6. HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The #1 Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style, and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style, and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing
Views: 8338 Kevin deLaplante
Power Up Your prose Using Fiction Writer's Skills
 
16:35
http://writeonpurpose.com/adventure For anyone writing nonfiction, whether a book, blog post, article or webinar script, you can employ the tools of fiction writing to grab the attention of your audience and truly pull them in. Think of the best novels or short stories you've read and you know the power of well written fiction. Now you'll find out how to apply skills like point of view, dialogue and storytelling to your nonfiction.
Charles Lamb Biography Part 1 | By Sumit Sir | Uphaar Classes
 
12:59
#uphaarClasses 👉 For all Free Notes, PDFs, Study Materials etc Join our all Telegram, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter Groups.. Our Telegram Group: 👉https://t.me/uphaar Our Instagram link: 👉https://www.instagram.com/uphaarclasses Our Facebook like page: 👉https://www.facebook.com/upharclasses Our Twitter page: 👉https://twitter.com/UphaarClasses ●● JOIN US FOR ●● ___ TET/CTET, TGT/PGT, SSC, BANK (PO/Clerk), CDS, CPO, NAVY, BBA, MBA, BCA, MCA, RLY, UPSC, NDA, CPS AIRFORCE, CAT, MAT etc. ___ 1. 9th - All subjects ( U.P. Board) 2. 10th - All subjects ( U.P. Board) 3. 11th - All subjects ( U.P. Board) 4. 12h - All subjects ( U.P. Board) 5. Motivational Videos 6. Yoga 7. Meditation (ध्यान) 8. Spiritual (अध्यात्म) 9. Smartphone techniques (Hidden features) 10. Adobe Photoshop 11. Corel Draw. 12. Computer techniques etc.
R.L. Stine Teaches Writing For Young Audiences | Official Trailer | MasterClass
 
02:19
Learn more about R.L. Stine Teaches Writing For Young Audiences: https://www.masterclass.com/rls The best-selling children’s author of Goosebumps and Fear Street breaks down his complete process for crafting page-turning thrillers. A master of the horror genre, Stine is a prolific author of more than 300 books for middle graders and young adults, which have sold more than 400 million copies worldwide and have garnered numerous awards. In his first-ever online class, Stine teaches his approach to writing for young audiences and dives into how he creates the thrills in his page-turner books, which he compares to a roller coaster ride—fast paced, exciting, and full of twists and turns, but always with a happy ending. The class is rooted in his belief that breaking the process down into manageable steps is the key to making writing achievable and fun. Students will learn the nuances of writing for different age groups, how to create terrifying monsters and build suspense, and how to surprise readers and keep them engaged—all while bringing his distinct sense of humor to his lessons. “I have written a lot of scary books, but the process of writing those books wasn’t scary,” said R.L. Stine. “You can create your own universe, and control people in that universe—you can make them funny or you can scare them. In my MasterClass, I hope to show students that writing doesn't have to be scary; and in fact, it can be a lot of fun.” In this online writing class, you’ll learn about: Generating Ideas Creating Monsters Conquering Writer's Block Outlining: Surprise Endings and Cliffhangers Outlining: Plot Twists and Tricks Writing for Different Age Levels Dialogue and Prose Style Mixing Horror and Humor Creating Middle Grade Characters Creating YA Characters Revising and Getting Feedback Developing a Book Series Writing as a Career More from MasterClass: James Patterson Teaches Writing: https://www.masterclass.com/jp Judy Blume Teaches Writing: https://www.masterclass.com/jbl Malcolm Gladwell Teaches Writing: https://www.masterclass.com/mg Bob Woodward Teaches Investigative Journalism: https://www.masterclass.com/bw Unlock every class for a full year with the MasterClass All-Access Pass. Try risk-free for 30 days: https://www.masterclass.com/all-access-pass Subscribe to the MasterClass channel on YouTube to get first access to exclusive content and new class announcements. About MasterClass MasterClass was founded on the idea that everyone should have "access to genius." The premier online education platform provides affordable, engaging, and inspirational online classes taught by world-renowned instructors, making it possible for anyone to learn from the best.
Views: 110935 MasterClass
Writing Coach and Mentor:  Thoughts on Narrative Prose Part One
 
05:13
Please visit www.ChristopherNoel.info
Views: 1730 ChristopherNoel