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What is BRAND? What does BRAND mean? BRAND meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is BRAND? What does BRAND mean? BRAND meaning - BRAND definition - BRAND explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. A brand (or marque for car model) is a name, term, design, symbol, or other feature that distinguishes one seller’s product from those of others. Brands are used in business, marketing, and advertising. A brand is any name, design, style, words or symbols used singularly or in combination that distinguish one product from another in the eyes of the customer Initially, livestock branding was adopted to differentiate one person’s cattle from another's by means of a distinctive symbol burned into the animal’s skin with a hot branding iron. However, the term has been extended to mean a strategic personality for a product or company, so that ‘brand’ now suggests the values and promises that a consumer may perceive and buy into. Branding is a set of marketing and communication methods that help to distinguish a company from competitors and create a lasting impression in the minds of customers. The key components that form a brand's toolbox include a brand’s identity, brand communication (such as by logos and trademarks), brand awareness, brand loyalty, and various branding (brand management) strategies. Brand equity is the measurable totality of a brand's worth and is validated by assessing the effectiveness of these branding components. In a fleeting market where traditional linear models of business are being replaced by more radical interconnected models, brand equity is one marketing technique that remains firmly rooted in prosperity. To reach such an invaluable brand prestige requires a commitment to a particular way of doing business. A corporation who exhibits a strong brand culture is dedicated on producing intangible outputs such as customer satisfaction, reduced price sensitivity and customer loyalty. A brand is in essence a promise to its customers that they can expect long-term security, a competitive frame of reference and consistent delivery of functional as well as emotional benefits. When a customer is familiar with a brand or favours it incomparably to its competitors, this is when a corporation has reached a high level of brand equity. Many companies are beginning to understand that there is often little to differentiate between products in the 21st century. Branding remains the last bastion for differentiation. In accounting, a brand defined as an intangible asset is often the most valuable asset on a corporation’s balance sheet. Brand owners manage their brands carefully to create shareholder value, and brand valuation is an important management technique that ascribes a money value to a brand, and allows marketing investment to be managed (e.g.: prioritized across a portfolio of brands) to maximize shareholder value. Although only acquired brands appear on a company's balance sheet, the notion of putting a value on a brand forces marketing leaders to be focused on long term stewardship of the brand and managing for value. The word ‘brand’ is often used as a metonym referring to the company that is strongly identified with a brand. Marque or make are often used to denote a brand of motor vehicle, which may be distinguished from a car model. A concept brand is a brand that is associated with an abstract concept, like breast cancer awareness or environmentalism, rather than a specific product, service, or business. A commodity brand is a brand associated with a commodity. Effective branding can result in higher sales of not only one product, but of other products associated with that brand. If a customer loves Pillsbury biscuits and trusts the brand, he or she is more likely to try other products offered by the company - such as chocolate-chip cookies, for example. Brand development, often the task of a design team, takes time to produce. Brand is the personality that identifies a product, service or company (name, term, sign, symbol, or design, or combination of them) and how it relates to key constituencies: customers, staff, partners, investors, etc....
Views: 2715 The Audiopedia
How to create a great brand name | Jonathan Bell
 
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Ever wondered why companies like Apple, Uber and AirBnB are so easily identified in a sea of advertising? Jonathan Bell gives step-by-step advice on how to create a lasting brand name. TEDArchive presents previously unpublished talks from TED conferences. Enjoy this unedited talk by Jonathan Bell. Filmed at TEDUniversity in 2016.
Views: 854043 TED Archive
16 FAMOUS LOGOS WITH A HIDDEN MEANING (That We Never Even Noticed)
 
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How to design a successful logo? How to build a famous brand for your business? Some of the most well-known logos in the world were purposefully designed to indicate something much more than simple beauty. In fact, it seems that in some cases, every line, curve, and color has meaning behind it. Adidas, Apple, BMW, Coca-Cola, Toyota… We see these famous brands everywhere but never consider what their logos exactly mean. Curious to know the secret? Watch the 16 famous logos with a hidden meaning you've never noticed. #logomeaning #logosecret # Hyundai 0:33 The letter ’Н’ symbolizes two people – a client and a representative of the company – shaking hands. Adidas 0:52 The current logo is three stripes at an angle which together form a triangle. This symbolizes a mountain, which in turn represents the challenges that all sportsmen have to overcome day after day. Apple 1:21 Rob Janoff, the designer who came up with the world-famous Apple company logo, explained his idea in one of his interviews. He bought a bag of apples, placed them in a bowl, and spent time drawing them for a week, trying to break the image down into something simple. Vaio 1:58 The first two letters of the Vaio logo symbolize an analogue wave. The last two are similar to the numbers 1 and 0 — that is, symbols of a digital signal. Amazon 2:14 The orange arrow is similar to a smile because the company wants its customers to be satisfied. The arrow is also stretched between the letters ’A’ and ’Z’, in a hint that the company sells absolutely every product you can imagine. Baskin Robbins 2:40 The pink-colored parts of the "BR" section make up the number 31, which is how many ice cream flavors Baskin Robbins used to famously sell. Toyota 2:56 The logo represents a stylized image of a needle eye with a thread passing through it. This is a hint at the company’s past – they used to produce weaving machines. Continental 3:28 Continental, a famous car tire producer, has a logo in which the first two letters depict a car wheel. Formula 1 3:41 If you look carefully at the white space between the letter ’F’ and the red stripes, you can see the number 1. Pinterest 3:59 On Pinterest, people collect images they like from across the Internet and ’pin’ them to their online boards. That’s why the image of a pin is hidden in the letter P. Beats 4:17 Beats, an audio equipment producer based in the USA, uses a logo in which the letter ’B’ looks like headphones on a person’s head. Toblerone 4:32 The famous chocolate company based in Bern, Switzerland, has a silhouette of a bear in its logo. That's because Bern is sometimes called a city of bears. BMW 4:55 The logo is simply a part of the Bavarian flag, the area of Germany where the company originated. LG 5:18 The logo is a stylized image of a person’s face. According to the company, this represents its aspiration to have human relations with their customers. Evernote 5:34 The corner of the elephant’s ear is folded over in a similar way how people fold the corner of a page to make notes. Coca-Cola 5:57 In the space between the letters ’O’ and ’L’, you can see the Danish flag. It’s purely a coincidence. Nevertheless, Coca-Cola has used this as part of its marketing campaigns in the Scandinavian country. If you’ve enjoyed this video, hit that thumbs up button! Music: That Feeling by HookSounds (http://www.hooksounds.com) is licensed under a Creative Commons license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 20222459 BRIGHT SIDE
What is BRAND IMPLEMENTATION? What does BRAND IMPLEMENTATION mean?
 
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What is BRAND IMPLEMENTATION? What does BRAND IMPLEMENTATION mean? BRAND IMPLEMENTATION meaning - BRAND IMPLEMENTATION definition - BRAND IMPLEMENTATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In marketing, brand implementation refers to the physical representation and consistent application of brand identity across visual and verbal media. In visual terms, this can include signage, uniforms, liveries, interior design and branded merchandise. Brand implementation encompasses facets of architecture, product design, industrial design, quantity surveying, engineering, procurement, project management and retail design. Brand implementation is an integrated part of a branding cycle and needs to be initiated during the brand design and development phase. Brand implementation is the continuous and consistent application of the brand's image in all business units, communication channels and media. This refers to marketing and branding as a unified whole. In that respect, brand implementation is a continuous process, which requires controlling the brand's image and presence despite changes in markets and company structure. Brand implementation emerged as a discipline in the 1990s when brand owners recognized the need for consistency across branded estates. Traditionally, brand implementation was handled by various parties, including shop-fitters, interior designers and sign companies. Lack of centralized project management led to inconsistencies, while information dissymmetry meant suppliers had too much control over brand issues. Brand implementation was consequently coined as an umbrella term for all aspects of the application and maintenance of physical brand assets. Brand implementation does not involve the design or creation of brand identity; brand implementation agencies work closely with branding agencies to ensure that their work is applied accurately and consistently. This relationship is referred to as Magic and Logic (RTM of Marketing Supply Chain International). Branding agencies look after the Magic (creative) and brand implementation agencies look after the Logic (implementation).
Views: 119 The Audiopedia
What is BRAND EQUITY? What does BRAND EQUITY mean? BRAND EQUITY meaning, definition & explanation
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ WANT VIDEO LIKE THIS ONE? ORDER IT HERE FROM INDUSTRY EXPERTS - http://bit.ly/2Uxpg5X ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is BRAND EQUITY? What does BRAND EQUITY mean? BRAND EQUITY meaning - BRAND EQUITY definition - BRAND EQUITY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Brand equity is a phrase used in the marketing industry which describes the value of having a well-known brand name, based on the idea that the owner of a well-known brand name can generate more money from products with that brand name than from products with a less well known name, as consumers believe that a product with a well-known name is better than products with less well-known names. Brand equity refers to the value of a brand. In the research literature, brand equity has been studied from two different perspectives: cognitive psychology and information economics. According to cognitive psychology, brand equity lies in consumer’s awareness of brand features and associations, which drive attribute perceptions. According to information economics, a strong brand name works as a credible signal of product quality for imperfectly informed buyers and generates price premiums as a form of return to branding investments. It has been empirically demonstrated that brand equity plays an important role in the determination of price structure and, in particular, firms are able to charge price premiums that derive from brand equity after controlling for observed product differentiation. Some marketing researchers have concluded that brands are one of the most valuable assets a company has, as brand equity is one of the factors which can increase the financial value of a brand to the brand owner, although not the only one. Elements that can be included in the valuation of brand equity include (but not limited to): changing market share, profit margins, consumer recognition of logos and other visual elements, brand language associations made by consumers, consumers' perceptions of quality and other relevant brand values. Consumers' knowledge about a brand also governs how manufacturers and advertisers market the brand. Brand equity is created through strategic investments in communication channels and market education and appreciates through economic growth in profit margins, market share, prestige value, and critical associations. Generally, these strategic investments appreciate over time to deliver a return on investment. This is directly related to marketing ROI. Brand equity can also appreciate without strategic direction. A Stockholm University study in 2011 documents the case of Jerusalem's city brand. The city organically developed a brand, which experienced tremendous brand equity appreciation over the course of centuries through non-strategic activities. A booming tourism industry in Jerusalem has been the most evident indicator of a strong ROI. While most brand equity research has taken place in consumer markets, the concept of brand equity is also important for understanding competitive dynamics and price structures of business-to-business markets. In industrial markets competition is often based on differences in product performance. It has been suggested however that firms may charge premiums that cannot be solely explained in terms of technological superiority and performance-related advantages. Such price premiums reflect the brand equity of reputable manufacturers. Brand equity is strategically crucial, but famously difficult to quantify. Many experts have developed tools to analyze this asset, but there is no agreed way to measure it. As one of the serial challenges that marketing professionals and academics find with the concept of brand equity, the disconnect between quantitative and qualitative equity values is difficult to reconcile. Quantitative brand equity includes numerical values such as profit margins and market share, but fails to capture qualitative elements such as prestige and associations of interest. Overall, most marketing practitioners take a more qualitative approach to brand equity because of this challenge. In a survey of nearly 200 senior marketing managers, only 26 percent responded that they found the "brand equity" metric very useful.
Views: 17318 The Audiopedia
What is BRAND MANAGEMENT? What does BRAND MANAGEMENT mean? BRAND MANAGEMENT meaning
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ WANT VIDEO LIKE THIS ONE? ORDER IT HERE FROM INDUSTRY EXPERTS - http://bit.ly/2Uxpg5X ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is BRAND MANAGEMENT? What does BRAND MANAGEMENT mean? BRAND MANAGEMENT meaning - BRAND MANAGEMENT definition - BRAND MANAGEMENT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In marketing, brand management is the analysis and planning on how that brand is perceived in the market. Developing a good relationship with the target market is essential for brand management. Tangible elements of brand management include the product itself; look, price, the packaging, etc. The intangible elements are the experience that the consumer has had with the brand, and also the relationship that they have with that brand. A brand manager would oversee all of these things. In 2001, Hislop defined branding as "the process of creating a relationship or a connection between a company's product and emotional perception of the customer for the purpose of generating segregation among competition and building loyalty among customers." In 2004 and 2008, Kapferer and Keller respectively defined it as a fulfillment in customer expectations and consistent customer satisfaction. Brand management is a function of marketing that uses special techniques in order to increase the perceived value of a product (see: Brand equity). Based on the aims of the established marketing strategy, brand management enables the price of products to grow and builds loyal customers through positive associations and images or a strong awareness of the brand. Brand management is the process of identifying the core value of a particular brand and reflecting the core value among the targeted customers. In modern terms, brand could be corporate, product, service, or person. Brand management build brand credibility and credible brands only can build brand loyalty, bounce back from circumstantial crisis, and can benefit from price-sensitive customers. Brand orientation refers to "the degree to which the organization values brands and its practices are oriented towards building brand capabilities". It is a deliberate approach to working with brands, both internally and externally. The most important driving force behind this increased interest in strong brands is the accelerating pace of globalization. This has resulted in an ever-tougher competitive situation on many markets. A product's superiority is in itself no longer sufficient to guarantee its success. The fast pace of technological development and the increased speed with which imitations turn up on the market have dramatically shortened product lifecycles. The consequence is that product-related competitive advantages soon risk being transformed into competitive prerequisites. For this reason, increasing numbers of companies are looking for other, more enduring, competitive tools – such as brands. Brand management aims to create an emotional connection between products, companies and their customers and constituents. Brand managers may try to control the brand image. Brand managers create strategies to convert a suspect to prospect, prospect to buyer, buyer to customer, and customer to brand advocates. Even though social media has changed the tactics of marketing brands, its primary goals remain the same; to attract and retain customers. However, companies have now experienced a new challenge with the introduction of social media. This change is finding the right balance between empowering customers to spread the word about the brand through viral platforms, while still controlling the company's own core strategic marketing goals. Word-of-mouth marketing via social media, falls under the category of viral marketing, which broadly describes any strategy that encourages individuals to propagate a message, thus, creating the potential for exponential growth in the message's exposure and influence. Basic forms of this are seen when a customer makes a statement about a product or company or endorses a brand. This marketing technique allows users to spread the word on the brand which creates exposure for the company. Because of this, brands have become interested in exploring or using social media for commercial benefit.
Views: 18044 The Audiopedia
This Test Will Show How Good Your Memory Is
 
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How to test your memory? We all recognise the logos of world-famous companies and brands, but how many of us actually pay attention to their details? Do you think you have the sharp eye and photographic memory to tell which of the logos that look very similar is correct? Here's an interesting test: choose a logo, and check for yourself! Don't cheat and try to activate your brain to find all the right answers. TIMESTAMPS Burger King 0:21 Nutella 0:41 Volkswagen 1:01 Nestle 1:21 Pepsi 1:41 Jaguar 2:00 Estrella 2:21 BMW 2:41 Nescafe 3:00 Danone 3:21 Knorr 3:40 Nestea 4:00 Peugeot 4:20 Snickers 4:40 Porsche 5:01 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 5088821 BRIGHT SIDE
Apple - Perspective
 
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Here's to those who have always seen things differently. http://www.apple.com/?cid=www-us-yt-per
Views: 3435302 Apple
Beginning Graphic Design: Color
 
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In this video, you’ll learn the basics of using color in graphic design. Visit https://www.gcflearnfree.org/beginning-graphic-design/color/1/ for our text-based lesson. This video includes information on: • Hue, saturation, and value • Creating monochromatic, analogous, and other color schemes • Avoiding common color mistakes • Choosing the right color • Finding inspiration We hope you enjoy!
Views: 1776747 GCFLearnFree.org
What is BRAND CULTURE? What does BRAND CULTURE mean? BRAND CULTURE meaning & explanation
 
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What is BRAND CULTURE? What does BRAND CULTURE mean? BRAND CULTURE meaning - BRAND CULTURE definition - BRAND CULTURE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Brand culture is a company culture in which employees "live" to brand values, to solve problems and make decisions internally, and deliver a branded customer experience externally. It is the desired outcome of an internal branding, internal brand alignment or employee engagement effort that elevates beyond communications and training. A brand in order to be relevant to consumers and sustainable over time must operate much like a culture. A company must develop an ethos and a worldview that it absolutely believes in and then should act in accordance with it. Everything the company does - every product or service it offers, every public statement, advertisement, website, internal policy, memo and business decisions it makes must be congruent with that ethos and worldview. If the brand truly represents an ethos and worldview which are attractive to consumers they will embrace the brand as part of their own identity. They will join the brand culture and participate in that culture as a way of expressing to the rest of the world who they are and what they believe in.
Views: 359 The Audiopedia
✏️ How To Design A Modern Logo | Start To Finish
 
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Creating a modern logo design can be hard. So in this video I'm giving you a sneaky look into a new logo design course! Here's the finished logo! http://imgur.com/a/wAn4p Let me know if you have any questions. Sponsored by Squarespace! 10% OFF code: PATERSON http://www.squarespace.com/williampaterson Logo Modernism : http://amzn.to/2s1sU9m Great Graphic Design Resources! https://creativemarket.com?u=Willberto Instagram: http://instagram.com/willpat Thanks for watching! Hope you enjoyed this video! If there's anything you would like me to cover in a Youtube Video, then let me know by commenting down below! If you like what I do, and you want to partner with me: Partner with me through Patreon : http://patreon.com/user?u=35829 Buy a T-Shirt or Poster,where some of the profits go staright to charity http://www.prophesyapparel.co.uk Hire me: http://www.williampatersondesign.com If you would like me to design you a logo, poster or anything for your Youtube Channel or business, then I'm your man! I would love to work with you to make what you want a reality! Check out my website and portfolio for more information. Hire me: http://www.williampatersondesign.com
Views: 1152627 Will Paterson
HORRIFYING "Hidden Meanings" In Famous Logos
 
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Subscribe! Because SMART IS THE NEW SEXY: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L Are you a fan of Apple products? Do you wear Timberland boots? And do you like Starbucks coffee? Have you ever looked at the logos of these companies and wondered what their meanings were? We at Smart is the New Sexy collected 4 logos that you see almost every day and found out what they represent. Beware; the world will never be the same after watching this video. Are there really hidden messages in these brand logos or is it just people’s fantasy? How do you think? Do you know any other hidden meanings? We would be glad to hear about them in the comment section below the video. Remember to click subscribe to stay among the smart and the sexy! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: http://facebook.com/enjoy.science/ The Bright Side of Youtube: https://goo.gl/rQTJZz 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 17032067 SMART BANANA
10 Secrets Hidden Inside Famous Logos
 
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See more at www.brilliantnews.com Branding nowadays is absolutely everywhere you look. We are constantly bombarded with so many icons and logos that we rarely stop to look further into them, but there are some very interesting and bizarre secrets hiding within these 10 famous logos! 1. Hyundai Bet you think the H logo is just the first letter of the South Korean car manufacturer Hyundai? Of course you do! But it actually represents two figures: the happy client shaking hands with the Hyundai salesman, cleverly projecting the subliminal message of a successful car purchase. 2. Apple It was Rob Janoff who was tasked with creating the apple logo back in 1977. Janoff bought a bag of apples and spent the week sketching them, trying to represent the perfect angle where the fruit couldn´t be mistaken for a cherry. This was when he added a bite mark and stumbled across the similarity between Bite and Byte. This was definitely a selling point for Steve Jobs. 3. Vaio The first two letters in the computer company's name symbolize a digital waveform and the io is designed to look like a 1 and a 0, representing binary and the mix of analog and digital. Also the melody that sounds on startup actually derives from the dialtone sounds on a telephone keypad on typing V-A-I-O 4. Amazon Always aiming to please, Amazon designed their logo to represent a smile, projecting a sense of satifaction in their brand. Not only that, but the arrow also starts at ´a´ and finishes at 'z' implying that the company stocks every product you could possibly desire. 5. Toyota T-o-y-o-t-a. All the letters of the companies name can be found within the logo. But what does it represent? You're thinking A big strong buffalo's head or a cowboy with a hat, right? Wrong! It actually represents a needle and thread! This Japanese car manufacturer actually began making weaving machines and keeps its logo to this day! 6. Continental Sometimes overlooked, the continental logo is simple and clever. The first two letters are designed to symbolize a car wheel. 7. Toblerone This awkward-to-eat chocolate treat doesn't just have a simple mountain in its logo. Toblerone is made in Bern, Switzerland, so it´s no surprise to see one of the Swiss alps in its logo. But it also hides a secret bear hidden in the mountain, as Bern is known as the city of bears and the bear symbol is heavily decorated throughout the city. 8. BMW The German motor company started out making airplanes in 1916 and many think that the checker pattern in its logo represents the spinning propellers of an airplane. But it is actually just the design of the Bavarian flag, the part of Germany where the company originated. 9. Domino's Pizza In 1960 College dropout Tom Monaghan borrowed $900 to by a tiny pizza placed called Dominic's. 5 years later he bought 2 more locations. The former owner refused Tom the permission to use his name in the franchise so Tom turned it into Domino's. The dice in the logo represent the first restaurant that he bought, followed by the next two, and he had planned on adding numbers on every new opening. That was before he realized how big the franchise would become. 10. Unilever Who is Unilever, right? It's actually a huge corporation which owns over 400 famous brands. You've only got to look on the back of any of these popular products to find their logo hiding there. (Axe, Lipton, Ben and Jerry's, Dove, Heartbrand, Hellman's) But that's not all, the actual unilever logo is made up of 25 smaller logos, each with a rich meaning. A strand of hair or an icecream representing various brands, to more obscure references, like this bee... Which of these logos surprised you the most? Comment Below!
Views: 16362145 Brilliant News
What is BRAND AWARENESS? What does BRAND AWARENESS mean? BRAND AWARENESS meaning
 
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What is BRAND AWARENESS? What does BRAND AWARENESS mean? BRAND AWARENESS meaning. Brand awareness is the extent to which a brand is recognized by potential customers, and is correctly associated with a particular product. Expressed usually as a percentage of the target market, brand awareness is the primary goal of advertising in the early months or years of a product's introduction. Brand awareness is related to the functions of brand identities in consumers’ memory and can be reflected by how well the consumers can identify the brand under various conditions. Brand awareness includes brand recognition and brand recall performance. Brand recognition refers to the ability of the consumers to correctly differentiate the brand they previously have been exposed to. This does not necessarily require that the consumers identify the brand name. Instead, it often means that consumers can respond to a certain brand after viewing its visual packaging images. Brand recall refers to the ability of the consumers to correctly generate and retrieve the brand in their memory. A brand name that is well known to the great majority of households is also called a household name. Brand awareness plays a huge part in the success of brands. There are many different ways to market a brand in order for it to display a certain image in the minds of consumers.It can be a logo, a name, a colour etc. that links itself to a brand in the mind of the consumer. Brand awareness and recognition is a step for marketers in communications as it affects the consumer choices that are made when it comes to the point of purchasing. A brand that is more well-known than others is more likely to be chosen for purchase over a brand where little is known about them. Consumers are less likely to purchase from a brand they don’t recognise or hardly recognise as it can be perceived as a risk for them and consumers do not typically like risks, as it means they could potentially waste their money.
Views: 4819 The Audiopedia
What is UMBRELLA BRAND? What does UMBRELLA BRAND mean? UMBRELLA BRAND meaning & explanation
 
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What is UMBRELLA BRAND? What does UMBRELLA BRAND mean? UMBRELLA BRAND meaning - UMBRELLA BRAND definition - UMBRELLA BRAND explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Umbrella branding (also known as family branding) is a marketing practice involving the use of a single brand name for the sale of two or more related products. Umbrella branding is mainly used by companies with a positive brand equity (value of a brand in a certain marketplace). All products use the same means of identification and lack additional brand names or symbols. This marketing practice differs from brand extension in that umbrella branding involves the marketing of similar products, rather than differentiated products, under one brand name. Hence, umbrella branding may be considered as a type of brand extension. The practice of umbrella branding does not disallow a firm to implement different branding approaches for different product lines (e.g. brand extension). Umbrella Branding is used to provide uniformity to certain product lines by grouping them under a single brand name, making them more easily identifiable and hence enhancing their marketability. All products under the same corporate umbrella (masterbrand providing structure and credibility to other products of the corporation) are expected to have uniform quality and user experience (e.g. All products carrying the parent brand must be of the same high quality standards). Factors that may determine the impact of umbrella branding include: The degree of commonality among the products falling under the corporate umbrella (e.g. Whether the products may act as substitutes for each other). The brand equity of a corporation (e.g. Whether the brand is known in its product market). Various theories attempt to explain a consumer's decisions and judgements during product purchasing that cause umbrella branding to be a successful marketing strategy. The categorisation theory is based upon the notion that consumers tend to categorise products by associating them to brands and their past experiences with those particular brands (stored in their category memory) in order to evade the initial confusion caused by the extensive choice of products they are presented with. New information on certain products are categorised into various sections such as product class (e.g. beverage) and brand (e.g. Coca-Cola) and then stored. Afterwards, consumers evaluate the product quality through past experiences with the brand's products as well as the brand equity. This theory also explains for the popularity of umbrella branding. Consumers tend to evaluate new products not only by positive brand equity but also if the brand's concept is consistent with their extended products. For instance, assuming that the consumer had satisfactory past experiences with the company's products, if Apple Inc. would develop and sell a new version of a Macbook, consumers would deem it more reliable and potentially of superior quality rather than if Apple would produce a new beverage due to Apple's past product line. The categorisation theory is based upon the notion that consumers tend to categorise products by associating them to brands and their past experiences with those particular brands (stored in their category memory) in order to evade the initial confusion caused by the extensive choice of products they are presented with. New information on certain products are categorised into various sections such as product class (e.g. beverage) and brand (e.g. Coca-Cola) and then stored. Afterwards, consumers evaluate the product quality through past experiences with the brand's products as well as the brand equity.
Views: 2926 The Audiopedia
Brand Positioning Definition - What Does Brand Positioning Mean?
 
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Go to http://www.corporatevocabulary.com for the complete lesson on Brand Positioning and a full course to give you the vocabulary and communication skills of a six-figure earner. In this video we teach you the definition of Brand Positioning.
Views: 2546 ereflect
10 Mistakes and Secrets You Never Knew About Famous Logos
 
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You’d think that the most successful companies in the world invest good money for their logos to be picture-perfect, yet even Google isn’t immune to messing up a logo design. Pay attention to 10 super famous company logos that are hiding something or have design fails and mistakes in them. We all know what the White House looks like, and you’d think there’d be no possible difficulties recreating it in an image. However, there were at least 3 attempts to create a logo, all of which resulted in mistakes. Wikipedia’s logo representing knowledge has a really embarrassing mistake right in the middle of the image! You wouldn’t catch it unless you know Chinese, so we’ll let you in on the big secret. Some people saw a man bending over vomiting in the London Olympics logo, while others were joking that it looked like Lisa Simpson in a compromising position. Salvador Dali hired to design the Chupa Chups logo put the brand’s name on a bright daisy and insisted that the logo be placed on top of the wrapper so that everyone could see it. And it’s basically stayed the same since then! When asked about the imperfection of letter “G” in their logo, Google chose the best route a person can when explaining his or her mistakes. They simply said that they’re aware of the inaccurate “G”, but that was all part of the plan! This slight imperfection makes their image playful and approachable. Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music TIMESTAMPS The White House 0:38 Wendy’s 1:29 Wikipedia 2:20 Hershey’s Kisses 3:28 The London Olympics 3:54 7-Eleven 4:42 Chupa Chups 5:17 Walt Disney 6:01 Pepsi 6:47 Google 7:17 SUMMARY -The designers of the White House’s logo made mistakes depicting the arch shape, mixed up the order of the windows and even lost pillars on the roof. -You might see nothing special in Wendy’s white and blue striped collar, but a closer look will reveal the word “mom” right in the center. -Wikipedia logo’s designer meant to write the Chinese word “wi”, but one tiny yet extra stroke made the symbol gibberish. -Lean your head towards your left shoulder, and you’ll get a sweet surprise: a chocolate kiss between the “K” and “I”. -Iranian participants in the London Olympic Games were upset by the peculiar style of the numbers 2012 because they read the word “Zion” in it. -All the letters in the word “eleven” in 7-Eleven logo are capitalized, except for one: the “n”. -The creator of Chupa Chups Spaniard Enric Bernat picked the most famous surrealist artist in the world Salvador Dali himself to design the new brand logo. -Those elegant swirls in the “W”, “i” and “y” in Disney logo look exactly like three sixes in a row. -If you wanna see what Pepsi can potentially do to you, just add a little circle on top of its logo, some arms and legs, and voila. -The letter “G” in Google logo doesn’t look the way it should. It’s not the complete perfect circle it’s supposed to be, and the inner circle is also far from ideal. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 4760026 BRIGHT SIDE
What Does It Mean To Brand A Product?
 
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Your brand will mean nothing to them. What is branding? Defining logo, brand identity, and brandbrand equity investopedia. Companies can create brand equity for their products by making them memorable, easily recognizable, and superior in quality 21 dec 2011 what does mean, how has the word's application changed first definition of is name given to a product or service this explains meaning word business marketing product, service, concept that publicly distinguished from although you do searching yourself, it common hire law firm 19 may 2016 according nielson's global new innovation survey, 59. Doesn't mean customers have any clue what you're talking about 5 oct 2015 the brand's purpose is not defined by you do for your. Googleusercontent search. If all you do is essentially rubber stamp your logo onto different things, really have it can be a way to talk about product or serviceunderstand what they mean and supply great service brand identity the business wants consumers perceive its. What is a brand, anyway? Forbes. What is brand? Definition from whatis. A negative gap between brand identity and image means a company is out of touch with market sentiment, which can who the trying to reach its products services? What does want perceive? . Merriam webster defines branding as the promoting of a product or service by definition process involved in creating unique name and image company counted campaign success when their most important things you can do is make sure to get correct brand name, term, design, symbol, other feature that distinguishes an organization however, term has been extended mean strategic personality for company, so 'brand' now suggests values promises example, nike's represents value 'just it' attitude will help encourage someone buy product, it directly then what does people say need your business? . 19 jun 2017 an individual brand means that each product of a company has an that if an individual brand flops, it does not hurt the other products. Does this company offer an exceptional product? Do they images mean to them, and how they're likely respond different brand 4 aug 2013 does a picture pop into your mind about company, such as its logo or colors? Or perhaps it is the company's approach customizing product. What does branding mean today? Wood street, inc what is branding? Definition and meaning businessdictionary the difference between marketing tronvig group. Branding is one of the most important aspects any business, large or small, retail b2b. What does brand mean? Small business bc. What is branding? And should small businesses care? . What does it take to define your brand experience? . Business the basics of branding entrepreneur article 77408 url? Q webcache. Brand equity refers to a value premium that company generates from product with recognizable name, when compared generic equivalent. An effective brand strategy gives you a major edge in increasingly competitive markets. Stephan the importance of brand appea
Views: 3 crazy sparky
What is BRAND ARCHITECTURE? What does BRAND ARCHITECTURE mean? BRAND ARCHITECTURE meaning
 
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What is BRAND ARCHITECTURE? What does BRAND ARCHITECTURE mean? BRAND ARCHITECTURE meaning - BRAND ARCHITECTURE definition - BRAND ARCHITECTURE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Brand architecture is the structure of brands within an organizational entity. It is the way in which the brands within a company’s portfolio are related to, and differentiated from, one another. The architecture should define the different leagues of branding within the organization; how the corporate brand and sub-brands relate to and support each other; and how the sub-brands reflect or reinforce the core purpose of the corporate brand to which they belong. Often, decisions about brand architecture are concerned with how to manage a parent brand, and a family of sub-brands – managing brand architecture to maximize shareholder value can often include using brand valuation model techniques. Brand architecture may be defined as an integrated process of brand building through establishing brand relationships among branding options in the competitive environment. The brand architecture of an organization at any time is, in large measure, a legacy of past management decisions as well as the competitive realities it faces in the marketplace. There are three key levels of branding: Corporate brand, umbrella brand, and family brand – Examples include Virgin Group and Heinz. These are consumer-facing brands used across all the firm's activities, and this name is how they are known to all their stakeholders – consumers, employees, shareholders, partners, suppliers and other parties. These brands may also be used in conjunction with product descriptions or sub-brands: for example Heinz Cream of Tomato Soup, or Virgin Trains. Endorsed brands, and sub-brands – For example, Nestle KitKat, Cadbury Dairy Milk, Sony PlayStation or Polo by Ralph Lauren. These brands include a parent brand – which may be a corporate brand, an umbrella brand, or a family brand – as an endorsement to a sub-brand or an individual, product brand. The endorsement should add credibility to the endorsed sub-brand in the eyes of consumers. Individual product brand – For example, Procter & Gamble’s Pampers or Unilever's Dove. The individual brands are presented to consumers, and the parent company name is given little or no prominence. Other stakeholders, like shareholders or partners, will know the producer by its company name. Procter & Gamble is quoted by many authors as the antithesis of a corporate brand (Asberg and Uggla, Muzellec and Lambkin, Olins). "However, this situation changed in 2012. After more than 150 years of invisibility of the organization for consumer, the brand developed corporate brand promise during the 2012 Olympic games. Commercials are aired on television around a message thanking all the "moms". In addition, each of their products is associated with the brand "PG" in advertisements for products. A recent example of brand architecture in action is the reorganization of the General Motors brand portfolio to reflect its new strategy. Prior to bankruptcy, the company pursued a corporate-endorsed hybrid brand architecture structure, where GM underpinned every brand. The practice of putting the "GM Mark of Excellence" on every car, no matter what the brand, was discontinued in August, 2009. In the run-up to the IPO, the company adopted a multiple brand corporate invisible brand architecture structure. The company's familiar square blue "badge" has been removed from the Web site and advertising, in favor of a new, subtle all-text logo treatment. Structuring a company brand portfolio can involve choosing a strategy based upon a number of variables, including the business strategy, market trends, competitive tactics, and sources of growth and profit. Often marketing mix modeling is used to help understand the role of brands in a portfolio, and how they support or cannibalize one another. A strong parent brand can be leveraged across multiple sub-brands to help maximize Return on Marketing Investment. Managing brand architecture to maximize shareholder value can often include using brand valuation model techniques.
Views: 3628 The Audiopedia
15 Secret Messages In Famous Logos
 
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Try out ThePremium Network for free https://goo.gl/T5dBQF Subscribe: https://goo.gl/cv6b96 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- A picture says a thousand words and logo designers know it. This is why they hid secret messages in a picture that seems to be really simple at first sight. Sometimes, it is just another way to represent their products, but there can also be an interesting story behind this. Some of them spend one million dollars on a new logo, and others find out that there is something hidden in the picture even if it was not their intention. And you will get the chance to see all of them because today, we are showing you 15 secret messages in famous logos. Have you heard about Apple’s story? Alan Turing is one of the men who worked on the first computers. Unfortunately, his work was not recognized, and people forced him to cure his homosexuality, so he ended his life by biting in an apple full of cyanide. Many people believe that this is why the apple in the logo is bitten and sometimes really colorful. But you will be surprised to hear that this story is not true! You’ll have to watch our video to know the real reason why this logo was designed like that. Stay tuned to hear more about famous logos of Pinterest, Toyota, Adidas, Beats, Wikipedia, GameCube, Roxy, Formula 1, NBC, Hyundai, Pepsi, and Coca-Cola. Once you see these secret messages, you will think about it every time you see these logos. Do you think that there are really secret messages or people are just making up stories to make it more interesting? Tell us what you think in the comments section down below. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheThingscom/ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.thethings.com/
Views: 5170416 TheThings
Pricing Design Work & Creativity
 
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Confused about how to price creative services? Are you charging hourly versus value based pricing? Is there a better way to determine what is fair to you and fair to the client? Watch this video and see how much money you are potentially leaving on the table by not pricing the client. Price the client and not the job. 👉Subscribe: https://goo.gl/F2AEbk 🔥Watch the 2019 Update: https://youtu.be/ivKnj9ffcmE How much do you charge for designing a logo? Are you undercharging your creative work? Learn how to charge 10 times more for a logo. Pricing design services. Part 3 of Money Talk workshop. 3:40 Why logos are worth more to some companies than others? 5:40 Price the client not the job 7:45 What does Blind charge to design a logo? 8:25 How do you quantify/justify the hours to a client? 9:45 Paula Scher's approach 11:40 Pricing role play 13:20 Most entrepreneurs value time. Symmetry of logic. 21:20 Clients don't choose the best option. They choose the least risky option. _ Listen to our podcast on iTunes: The Futur https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-futur/id1152604340?mt=2 HOW TO SUPPORT THE FUTUR: Purchase a Kit: http://theskool.co/collections/all or subscribe to the secret and private Master mind group on Facebook with exclusive videos not released anywhere else. Use our Amazon Affiliate Link: http://astore.amazon.com/chrisdo-20 Buy useful design tools from Creative Market: https://creativemarket.com/?u=ChrisDo Get your business cards printed at Moo: http://www.moo.com/share/qn6x98 _ Connect with us online: http://thefuturishere.com https://www.facebook.com/theFuturisHere/ https://twitter.com/thefuturishere Need brand strategy help? Visit Blind LA’s WEBSITE: http://blind.com Connect with Chris Do: https://twitter.com/theChrisDo Twitter https://www.facebook.com/BizOfDesign https://www.instagram.com/thechrisdo The PROCESS Credits: Executive Producer– Chris Do Hosts– Chris Do Director– Aaron Szekely Cameraman– Aaron Szekely, Andrew Truong Producer– Aaron Szekely Editor– Aaron Szekely, Mark Contreras Show Open– designed by William VanSkaik, animated by Bara Kwon Translations: Mandarin Traditional— Angie Hu Mandarin Simplified—Siyu Lee Spanish— Pablo Del Mares === *By making a purchase through any of our affiliate links, we receive a very small commission at no extra cost to you. This helps us on our mission to provide quality education to you. Thank you.
Views: 1555518 The Futur
Brand Equity Definition - What Does Brand Equity Mean?
 
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Go to http://www.corporatevocabulary.com for the complete lesson on Brand Equity and a full course to give you the vocabulary and communication skills of a six-figure earner. In this video we teach you the definition of Brand Equity.
Views: 11940 ereflect
What is BRAND STRENGTH ANALYSIS? What does BRAND STRENGTH ANALYSIS mean?
 
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What is BRAND STRENGTH ANALYSIS? What does BRAND STRENGTH ANALYSIS mean? BRAND STRENGTH ANALYSIS meaning - BRAND STRENGTH ANALYSIS definition - BRAND STRENGTH ANALYSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Brand strength analysis describes efforts to determine the strength a brand has compared with its competitors. Software brand strength is hard to measure accurately. Techniques from competitor analysis can be used to compare companies over time. Crowley and Zajas have analyzed how to determine the benefits of strong brand names in the software sector. Quantitative marketing research by sampling large customer bases using adaptive conjoint techniques and qualitative marketing research by focus groups and observing customers in stores are examples of techniques they recommend. Benefits to a company of good brand recognition include speeding up new product acceptance, enabling market share penetration by advertising, and resisting price erosion. During the decision process for software buying, usually 95% of customers buy a brand that they were previously aware of, 90% buy a brand that they considered beforehand, and 80% buy the specific brand they expected to. According to Crowley and Zajas, branding power measurement is an important way that companies can keep track of their position in the software market.
Views: 85 The Audiopedia
What is BRAND LICENSING? What does BRAND LICENSING mean? BRAND LICENSING meaning & explanation
 
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What is BRAND LICENSING? What does BRAND LICENSING mean? BRAND LICENSING meaning - BRAND LICENSING definition - BRAND LICENSING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Licensing means renting or leasing of an intangible asset. It is a process of creating and managing contracts between the owner of a brand and a company or individual who wants to use the brand in association with a product, for an agreed period of time, within an agreed territory. Licensing is used by brand owners to extend a trademark or character onto products of a completely different nature. Examples of intangible assets include a song ("Somewhere Over The Rainbow"), a character (Donald Duck), a name (Michael Jordan), or a brand (The Ritz-Carlton). An arrangement to license a brand requires a licensing agreement. A licensing agreement authorizes a company which markets a product or service (a licensee) to lease or rent a brand from a brand owner who operates a licensing program (a licensor). A company may choose to license its brand(s) when they believe there is strong consumer acceptance for brand extensions or products. For example, when Apple launched the iPod there was an immediate need for accessories such as headphones, charging and syncing stations and carrying cases. Apple decided not to manufacture these products and instead chose to have a licensee make the products. By doing so, Apple could offer branded "Earbud Headphones", "iPod docking stations" and "iPod socks." Each is made by a separate company but together offer the consumer an elegant solution. All of these accessories are sold by licensees. Apart from benefits to licensors, there are benefits to licensees as well. Licensees lease the rights to a brand for incorporation into their merchandise, but do not share ownership in it. Having access to major national and global brands, and the logos and trademarks associated with those brands, gives the licensee significant benefits. The most important of these is the marketing power the brand brings to the licensee’s products. When brand managers enter or extend into new product categories via licensing they create an opportunity for a licensee to grow their company. Below is an example of the licensed product process steps: Licensor chooses the product categories to be licensed. Licensor finds and negotiates a license with the best licensees. Licensees develop concepts, prototypes and final production samples and submit for approval. Licensor approves licensed products for sale. Licensees sell licensed products to authorized retailers. Licensees expect that the license will provide them with sales growth. This sales growth may be in the form of growth within existing market or the opportunity to enter a new market. To achieve this, licensees expect that the brand they are licensing has significant brand preference, that it will open doors and ultimately help them meet or exceed their business objectives. The licensing contract forces the licensee to achieve certain sales targets and royalties; therefore, the goal of the licensee is to quickly meet their business objectives, thereby achieving their contract obligations. Royalties are the monies paid to a licensor by the licensee for the right to use the licensed property. It is calculated by multiplying the Royalty Rate by the Net Sales. The main international professional association for brand licensing is the Licensing Industry Merchandiser's Association, which sponsors the annual Licensing International Expo.....
Views: 1570 The Audiopedia
Brand Definition - What Does Brand Mean?
 
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Go to http://www.corporatevocabulary.com for the complete lesson on Brand and a full course to give you the vocabulary and communication skills of a six-figure earner. In this video we teach you the definition of Brand.
Views: 303 ereflect
What is BRAND EXTENSION? What does BRAND EXTENSION mean? BRAND EXTENSION meaning & explanation
 
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What is BRAND EXTENSION? What does BRAND EXTENSION mean? BRAND EXTENSION meaning - BRAND EXTENSION definition - BRAND EXTENSION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Brand extension or brand stretching is a marketing strategy in which a firm marketing a product with a well-developed image uses the same brand name in a different product category. The new product is called a spin-off. Organizations use this strategy to increase and leverage brand equity (definition: the net worth and long-term sustainability just from the renowned name). An example of a brand extension is Jello-gelatin creating Jello pudding pops. It increases awareness of the brand name and increases profitability from offerings in more than one product category. A brand's "extendibility" depends on how strong consumer's associations are to the brand's values and goals. Ralph Lauren's Polo brand successfully extended from clothing to home furnishings such as bedding and towels. Both clothing and bedding are made of linen and fulfill a similar consumer function of comfort and hominess. Arm & Hammer leveraged its brand equity from basic baking soda into the oral care and laundry care categories. By emphasizing its key attributes, the cleaning and deodorizing properties of its core product, Arm & Hammer was able to leverage those attributes into new categories with success. Another example is Virgin Group, which was initially a record label that has extended its brand successfully many times; from transportation (aeroplanes, trains) to games stores and video stores such as Virgin Megastores. In the 1990s, 81 percent of new products used brand extension to introduce new brands and to create sales. Launching a new product is not only time-consuming but also needs a big budget to create brand awareness and to promote a product's benefits. Brand extension is one of the new product development strategies which can reduce financial risk by using the parent brand name to enhance consumers' perception due to the core brand equity. While there can be significant benefits in brand extension strategies, there can also be significant risks, resulting in a diluted or severely damaged brand image. Poor choices for brand extension may dilute and deteriorate the core brand and damage the brand equity. Most of the literature focuses on the consumer evaluation and positive impact on parent brand. In practical cases, the failures of brand extension are at higher rate than the successes. Some studies show that negative impact may dilute brand image and equity. In spite of the positive impact of brand extension, negative association and wrong communication strategy do harm to the parent brand even brand family. Product extensions are versions of the same parent product that serve a segment of the target market and increase the variety of an offering. An example of a product extension is Coke vs. Diet Coke in the same product category of soft drinks. This tactic is undertaken due to the brand loyalty and brand awareness associated with an existing product. Consumers are more likely to buy a new product that has a reputable brand name on it than buy a similar product from a competitor without a reputable brand name. Consumers receive a product from a brand they trust, and the company offering the product can increase its product portfolio and potentially gain a larger share in the market in which it competes. Brand extension research mainly focuses on consumer evaluation of extension and attitude toward the parent brand. In their 1990 model, Aaker and Keller provide a sufficient depth and breadth proposition to examine consumer behaviour and a conceptual framework. The authors use three dimensions to measure the fit of extension. First, the "Complement" refers to consumers taking two product classes (extension and parent brand product) as complementary in satisfying their specific needs.
Views: 3346 The Audiopedia
What is BRAND LANGUAGE? What does BRAND LANGUAGE mean? BRAND LANGUAGE meaning & explanation
 
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What is BRAND LANGUAGE? What does BRAND LANGUAGE mean? BRAND LANGUAGE meaning - BRAND LANGUAGE definition - explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Brand language is the body of words, phrases, and terms that an organization uses to describe its purpose or in reference to its products. Brand language is used in marketing to help consumers connect specific words or ideas to specific companies or products. When developing a brand language word choice and tone are the two fundamental components. Word choice is the vocabulary that is used in the marketing or advertising, while tone refers to the attitude of the advertisement. Tone is not limited to language, it can also be incorporated through visual elements as well as delivery. Brand language is a part of verbal brand identity, includes naming of both corporation and the products they sell as well as taglines, voice, and tone. Another benefit of developing a brand language is the ability for a corporation or product to be recognizable across international borders, while other advertising codes can be misinterpreted, words can be translated to ensure brand unity. As a part of the advertising world brand language's primary function is to identify a company or product and also differentiate that company/product from competitors. The language is used to get the attention of the consumer and then to relay information about what is being advertised. It is also used to ensure that when people communicate about the product there are fewer misunderstandings and more clarity about purpose and the role that this commodity wants to play in the lives of the consumer. The brand language can also be associated with competing for investors, recruiting talent, or acquiring business partners. Brand language is also often used internally within a company. For motivational and leadership situations, branding language helps to promote the brand values and is treated as a commodity alongside the actual products and/or company. When positive words become strongly associated with particular brands, these words can become assets—to the point that competing brands may find the words difficult to use. For example, in his book Brand Sense (Kogan Page, 2005) Martin Lindstrom quotes extensive word association research carried out by Millward Brown demonstrating the strong link between the words “magic” and “kingdom” and Disney. Disney appears to have made a successful investment in “owning” these words. Lindstrom’s studies found that Disney has the highest number of words that are associated with one specific brand (among brands that were surveyed). Along with “magic” and “kingdom” Disney has been shown to have branded the words: “dreams,” “creativity,” “fantasy,” “smiles” and “generation”. The study that he conducted asked people to associate those words with a brand and over 80% of people asked said that they thought of Disney. Part of the reason that Disney has been so successful is that they are able to seamlessly integrate traditional and new media markets in a way that allows them to reach large audiences with a stable continuous message. Other campaigns that have powerful brand language recognition are Kellogg’s and Gillette. Part of the idea with branded language is to go beyond just a slogan and to imbue ordinary words with the idea or essence of a particular brand. With Kellogg’s the word that is associated with them is “crunch”. With Gillette the word that consumers see as synonymous with the brand is “masculine.” In this case the word masculine also conjures socially constructed ideologies, which helps the brand become a more stable construction in the mind of consumers. The disadvantage of very strong brand language associations is that they may prove a hindrance if a brand wishes to position itself differently. With the expansion of social media, there is a new market for advertising and the use of branding language. Social media allows for companies to move beyond the more traditional forms of advertising and into a new arena. However, it is important that the language of the advertising remain consistent throughout a campaign no matter what the platform. Different social media sites offer various audiences and come with particular and differing platforms. Using the right language and jargon is important so that companies seem engaged and are able to spread their message to multiple audiences.
Views: 219 The Audiopedia
What is CULT BRAND? What does CULT BRAND mean? CULT BRAND meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is CULT BRAND? What does CULT BRAND mean? CULT BRAND meaning - CULT BRAND definition - CULT BRAND explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A Cult brand is a product or service with a committed customer base. The attainment of such true believers or ‘near fanatical’ customers is made possible because cult brands sell more than a product, they sell a lifestyle. Cult brands fundamentally create an entirely new universe revolving around its products and places the customers in the very center of their world. Two words appropriately associated with a cult brand are ‘love’ and ‘madness’; The very phrase used to describe cult branding by Melanie Wells in 2001: With the association of the words ‘love and madness’ simply describing the devout followers of a brand or otherwise in this scenario a ‘cult brand’. A cult brand is a brand with an extreme loyal customer-base in which the consumers visualise the brand as something more than just a product, but also as a life style where the brand becomes a piece of their everyday lives. Better stated, cult-brands sell an image as opposed to a product. People with a loyal following to these brands are drawn to such an idea through the desire of wanting to belong. These brands create a community in which certain psychological needs are met, where people who share similar interests are able to coincide with one-another (Melanie Wells, 2001). An example of a cult follower can be found within the doughnut business otherwise known as ‘Krispy Kreme’. Krispy Kreme’s example of a devout following stems from their lack of advertising. The company spends less than 1% of their total revenue (as of the year 2001) on advertising yet through the years 1997 and 2001, Krispy Kreme more than doubled their sales. This happened due to the nature of the process in which a cult brand gains momentum from its followers. Through developing a small customer base of fanatic followers, the company is graced with positive reviews via ‘word-of-mouth’ in which fanatical followers are able to convert other consumers into ‘brand cultists’ to turn an underground brand into a house-hold name. A Brand is a name, symbol, logo, et al. that is identifiable to a single product or organization.
Views: 323 The Audiopedia
How to Spot a Fake Designer Handbag In 7 Steps
 
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How to choose the real designer handbag and spot a fake handbag? How to differ fake from real easily? Buying a luxury car for men: you have to be very attentive to small details and know everything about your dream handbag. That’s why we decided to create a short yet very useful guide that will teach you how to choose the real thing. TIMESTAMPS Pay attention to details 0:44 Check clasps, buttons, and zippers 1:15 Pay attention to the materials 1:49 Check tags and labels 2:15 Take a closer look at its serial number 2:41 An expensive handbag always has expensive packaging 3:03 Each brand has its very own distinct characteristics 3:25 SUMMARY - All of the stitches should be perfectly even, and there should be no loose threads or any other visual defects or imperfections. All genuine designer handbags are handmade. - Pay special attention to small things like metal clasps, buttons, zipper pulls, plates, and locks. Their quality should be perfect, and they should have a number or a name printed on them, which is another sign of quality and authenticity. - A famous brand doesn’t use rough leather. They only use fine, high-quality materials. When you touch them, you feel like you are in paradise. - Fake items often have the brand names printed in different fonts, smudgy letters, or even with misspellings. Tags and labels are always a giveaway. - The label with the number is sealed and attached in a special way, making it impossible to remove without damaging. Fake items usually have a sticker with a number that has just been glued somewhere on the surface. - An expensive designer handbag always has expensive packaging, often made of the highest-quality materials. The package your precious bag comes in should have no color defects whatsoever. - Before visiting a store, do some research on the specific attributes of the chosen brand. Remember – each brand has its very own distinct characteristics. Do you know other ways to recognize fake bags? Share your experience with us in the comments down below! Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1064554 BRIGHT SIDE
What is SUSTAINABILITY BRAND? What does SUSTAINABILITY BRAND mean' SUSTAINABILITY BRAND meaning
 
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What is SUSTAINABILITY BRAND? What does SUSTAINABILITY BRAND mean' SUSTAINABILITY BRAND meaning - SUSTAINABILITY BRAND definition - SUSTAINABILITY BRAND explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Sustainability brands are products and services that are branded to signify a special added value in terms of environmental and social benefits to the customer and thus enable the differentiation from competitors. Sustainability branding is the process of creating and maintaining an identity of a specific product, service, or business that reflects special added value in terms of environmental and social benefits. A brand is only perceived as being sustainable if it can credibly convey sustainability benefits which are noticeable by and relevant to the consumer. A sustainability brand must have an integrated culture for success. The key to a sustainable brand is trust between the consumer and the brand, only when this is achieved can a sustainable brand truly generate a USP and reap the benefits of it. Opposed to the term green brands which mainly focuses on environmentally sound business practices, sustainability brands additionally acknowledge the social dimension of providing products and services. This entails, among others, health and safety issues resulting from direct or indirect product use (consumption level) as well as the conditions under which a particular product is produced (production level). The physical protection and well-being of people at work (i.e. employees as well as workers within the supply chains) are important indicators of sustainability brands and sustainability marketing in general which adheres to the triple bottom line of ecological (environmental), social (equity), and financial (economic) sustainability. A brand is able to evoke positive or negative feelings, especially in the context of sensitive social and ecological issues. The more positive the perceptions and feelings are towards a brand, the higher will be the likelihood of identification and loyalty amongst consumers. It is therefore crucial in sustainability marketing to build up strong brands. In doing so, companies face far-reaching decisions in the areas of brand positioning (1), sustainability brand name selection (2), and sustainability brand development (3), in order to create and build sustainability brands that consumers associate with social and environmental added value. Environmental marketing claims on products and packages need to be made (and read) with caution. Ambiguous greenwashing titles such as green product, green packaging and environmentally friendly can be confusing without specific definition. Some regulators, such as the US Federal Trade Commission, are providing guidance Since the adjective “sustainable” might convey the notion of brands that have long-lasting success, implicating durable competitive advantage without any particular reference to a sustainability agenda, the term “sustainability brand” should be used to prevent ambiguity. Albeit subtle difference, the latter explicitly emphasizes the notion of brands which have built their brand image upon sustainable business practices that consumers value. Sustainability brands are commonly referred to in the field of sustainability marketing.
Views: 220 The Audiopedia
What do we really mean by brand?
 
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When you mention the word brand or branding, people often think about a logo or design. Although that’s part of it, to get to the heart of a brand you actually have to dig much deeper. Watch this video to find out what a brand really boils down to.
Views: 44 Dave Charest
Brand Extension Definition - What Does Brand Extension Mean?
 
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Go to http://www.corporatevocabulary.com for the complete lesson on Brand Extension and a full course to give you the vocabulary and communication skills of a six-figure earner. In this video we teach you the definition of Brand Extension.
Views: 1542 ereflect
16 Famous Logos With A Hidden Meaning|hidden messages in company logo
 
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some of the most famous logos in the world, and others a little less well known, have hidden meanings which make them that little bit extra special. Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for 'fair use' for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair Subscribe Now https://goo.gl/Xhcsq8 ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ Follow and Like Me ☀ Twitter : https://twitter.com/iarslanpk ☀ Facebook: http://facebook.com/iarslanpk ☀ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/iarslanpk ☀ Visit Our Website https://www.sabparho.com ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ☀ If you found this video valuable, give it a like 👍 . ☀ If you know someone who needs to watch it, share it ↪️. ☀ Leave a comment below with your thoughts ✍ .More Such Videos Truth of WWE Fights 7 Proof That WWE Fights are FAKE https://youtu.be/WXjwFa0Md-M 10 Things You Didn't Know About Hitler https://youtu.be/OxmRbo2fFyw 10 Things You're Doing Wrong in the Shower https://youtu.be/dFq_QpZRYd0 It turns out that some of the most well-known logos in the world were designed to indicate something much more than simple beauty. In fact, it seems that in some cases, every line, curve and color has meaning behind it. Here are 17 famous logos with hidden meanings that we never noticed before. Fascinating! 17. Hyundai Many people are inclined to think that the logo of the South Korean conglomerate Hyundai is simply the first letter of its name. But actually, the letter ’Н’ symbolises two people (a client and a representative of the company) shaking hands. 16. Adidas The name Adidas is derived from that of its founder, Adolf Dassler. The company’s logo has changed over time, but it’s always included three stripes. The current configuration is three stripes at an angle which together form a triangle. This symbolises a mountain, which in turn represents the challenges which all athletes have to overcome. 15. Apple Rob Yanov, the designer who created with the world-famous Apple company logo, has explained how he came up with the idea: ’I bought a whole bag of apples, placed them in a bowl, and spent time drawing them for a week, trying to break the image down into something simple. Taking a bite out of an apple was part of the experiment, and completely by coincidence I realised that ’bite’ sounded exactly the same as the computer term ’byte’. 14. Sony Vaio The first two letters of the logo of Sony Vaio make up a wave, which represents an analogue symbol, whereas the last two are similar to the numbers 1 and 0 — that is, symbols of a digital signal. 13. Amazon At first glance, Amazon’s logo appears to be nothing special. But it was designed with the philosophy of the company in mind. The orange arrow is similar to a smile, as the company wants its customers to be satisfied. The arrow is also stretched between the letters ’A’ and ’Z’, in a hint that the company sells absolutely every product imaginable (’from A to Z’). 12. Baskin-Robbins The pink-colored areas of the "BR" part of the logo here make up the number 31, which is the number of different flavors of ice cream that Baskin-Robbins used to famously sell. 11. Toyota Many people have compared the logo of the Japanese car-producer Toyota to the image of a cowboy wearing a stereotypical hat. But it actually represents a stylised image of the eye of a needle with a thread passed through it. This is a hint at the company’s past — of a time when it used to produce weaving machines. At the same time, the individual parts of the logo also spell out the letters of the company’s name. 8. Pinterest The logo of the popular internet site Pinterest, which people use to collect images they like from across net and ’pin’ them to their online notice board, has the image of a pin hidden in the letter P. 6. Toblerone Toblerone, the famous chocolate company based in Bern, Switzerland, includes a silhouette of a bear in its logo, on account of the fact that Bern is sometimes called a city of bears. 5. BMW It’s often supposed that the central part of the BMW logo symbolizes the rotating blades of an airplane, in line with the company’s early history of aviation technology, but it is in fact simply a part of the Bavarian flag — the area of Germany where the company originated. 4. LG The logo of the South Korean electronics company LG is a stylized image of a person’s face. According to the company, this represents its aspiration to maintain ordinary, human relations with its customers. 3. Evernote Elephants are known for having impressive memories, including their ability to remember both faces and events. It’s for this reason that Evernote, a note-taking application, uses an image of the animal as part of its logo. 1. Pepsi 2. Coca-Cola
Views: 4732645 iArslan
Brand Identity VS Image: Are Yours MATCHING UP?
 
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In today’s video, Kim Barrett from Your Social Voice talks about brand identity and brand image and HOW these differ. How are you ensuring that your identity matches your image in the marketplace and if they don't, how can you work towards this? Make sure you join us at the ONLY event for #certifiedballers in the world where Kim will be sharing EVERYTHING you need to be a baller and drastically grow your reach and impact! This is being held in PERTH at Optus Stadium on 8 June! Check it out here; https://www.certifiedballerslive.com.au/register Subscribe So You Never Miss A Video: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Rd4Ph7wZvyiXVnNE45Qww?sub_confirmation=1 00:40 - Kim defines Brand Identity VS Brand Image 01:58 - Kim talks about what it means when people refer to 'OFF BRAND' 03:37 - Kim provides some tips on matching up your identity and image in the market place 05:15 - How FAR AWAY BAY here in Western Australia portrays value Check out some Marketing Mindset HACKS 👉🏻👉🏻👉🏻👉🏻👉🏻🔥🔥🔥 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AaraghJ4QQ4 For more videos on online marketing strategies and tips, be sure to subscribe to our channel here on Youtube at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Rd4Ph7wZvyiXVnNE45Qww?sub_confirmation=1 For more marketing strategies and Facebook ad hacks visit our website at: http://www.yoursocialvoice.com.au ====================================================== Connect With YSV On Social: Facebook: http://bit.ly/2kWjHuc Instagram: http://bit.ly/2svESZf YouTube: http://bit.ly/2tpFHix ====================================================== Connect With Kim Barrett On Social: Facebook: http://bit.ly/2PwfbCM Instagram: http://bit.ly/2Ptskg3
Views: 36 Your Social Voice
Brand Name vs. Generic
 
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What is the difference between brand name and generic products? AsapTHOUGHT TASTE TEST: https://youtu.be/rYmon9AO1os Subscribe for more: http://bit.ly/asapsci Written by Mitchell Moffit, Gregory Brown, Amanda Edward and Rachel Salt GET THE ASAPSCIENCE BOOK: http://asapscience.com/book/ FOLLOW US! Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube AsapINSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/asapscience/ Facebook: http://facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Twitter: http://twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE Tumblr: http://asapscience.tumblr.com Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! SNAPCHAT 'whalewatchmeplz' and 'pixelmitch' Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). Send us stuff! ASAPSCIENCE INC. P.O. Box 93, Toronto P Toronto, ON, M5S2S6 Reference / Further Reading [1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1852907/ [2] http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/ibuprofen [3] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibuprofen_brand_names [4] https://www.cadth.ca/generic-drugs/similarities-and-differences-between-brand-name-and-generic-drugs [5] http://www.capsugel.com/media/library/excipient-requirements-in-the-formulation-of-solid-oral-drug-forms.pdf [6] http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/QuestionsAnswers/ucm100100.htm [7] https://advil.net.au/what_is_pain/difference.html [8] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26455677 [9] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26132680 [10] https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/generic-drugs-are-they-equivalent/ [11] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26561521 [12] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26620809 [13] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23700299 [14] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25222387 [15] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22174986 [16] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/22/generic-prescriptions_n_6730194.html [17] http://www.businessinsider.com/generic-drugs-vs-brand-name-2014-5 [18] http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs40261-015-0351-1 [19] http://www.hindawi.com/journals/jtrans/2011/480642/ [20] http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/whats-the-difference-betw-2004-12-13/ [21] http://www.cbsnews.com/news/viagra-to-go-generic-in-2017-according-to-pfizer-agreement/ [22] http://www.salk.edu/about/history-of-salk/jonas-salk/ [23] http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=181562
Views: 3794997 AsapSCIENCE
Brand Attributes Definition - What Does Brand Attributes Mean?
 
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Go to http://www.corporatevocabulary.com for the complete lesson on Brand Attributes and a full course to give you the vocabulary and communication skills of a six-figure earner. In this video we teach you the definition of Brand Attributes.
Views: 1503 ereflect
What Does The Future Hold For Baselworld...Is This The End?!
 
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So it's official. The watches were releases for Baselworld 2019 and yeah I know, this and that, the critics are raving. The haters are hating, but the watches are finally out. So what do I think about what came out? Well, very simple. Was I wrong? Well, they were predictions, so, who the hell cares? I pretty much think every single blogger was wrong. That's why they're called predictions. However, sticking to Rolex, I think the one word that everybody can agree on is disappointment. So the first watch that obviously grabs everyone's attention is the Batman with the Jubilee. I guess, you know what I mean, it's not a terrible watch, but I don't understand what's the whole big deal about it, you know? I don't know man. Was it necessary? I don't think so. I think with the Pepsi just being released so soon...I don't know. I don't really care much for it. It's cool, but I don't think it's enough to carry the brand throughout the year, but whatever! I guess with this whole Baselworld thing now, it's like it puts this pressure on the brands to every year release these new releases and it's kind of like, every year is like the pressure to constantly have this new watch, so that being said, the other one that also I'm not really that crazy about was the new Sea-Dweller in two-tone. I mean, I guess, OK? It's a nice watch, whatever! Like I said, I'm just not that excited about it. I think the only one that I'm mostly excited about is, I want to see in person the 42 millimeter Yacht-Master in white gold and rubber. You see, that's something different. They made the watch bigger, completely different. That's gonna be I guess something just new to experience. Another one, cuz I'm not gonna talk about all of them, is the GMT with the meteorite dial. It's nice, I guess. You put meteorite in anything and it looks good, but I don't know man. I feel like that watch was nice to begin with, the white gold with the black dial. Then they came out with a blue dial. Whatever! Then they just said [bleep] it, just throw meteorite in it, you know? It's nice, again I'm not saying it's not nice. I guess I'm just disappointed. I don't know if I was just expecting like this whole new freaking grand complication model would come out for Rolex or what, but I think everybody agrees that it was just kind of like, “Ehhh, ehhh,” that's kind of how we feel about the Rolexes that came out. Now as far as Patek is concerned, I mean they did have several watches that came out, but the one that stands out to me was the 5726 Nautilus in steel with the blue dial. I mean, way to fan the flames on this whole Nautilus blue dial extravaganza, you know? It's like, how much is it gonna be now and how long is the waiting list gonna be, you know? It's not a bad looking watch. I mean, clearly guys, it's obviously nice, and I've always said by the way, that the 5726 is the second favorite watch that I like after the 5980 because you get the size, so it's a little bit thicker, not as slim as the 5712 or the 5711, so I think it's a perfect compromise from the 5980. Now, with the blue dial, you know how that goes. $50,000 over retail or what not. Now, Hublot this year actually quite surprised me. They released a new Classic Fusion Ferrari. I'm not crazy about the watch, the way it looks, but it was quite surprising. You see, that's how you come out with a whole new model, completely different watch all the way through and you gotta give them credit for that. There's gonna be biased for it, there's gonna be people that like it. I just think it was good and bold for them to just come out with a whole new line as opposed to some of the other brands that really just dropped a dial or a different color and again, I think that this pressure of coming out with a brand new model and design every year is a little bit much, but Hublot did come out with something new and it's something different. Now, the one brand that really for me showcased the most amount of like shock and awe models, in my opinion, was Jacob & Co. I mean, I think they released easily 8 or 9 different new pieces. The three that stood out to me the most was one, the Astronomia Casino. That one for me was an awesome play. I mean, one, I love roulette, but to have an actual working roulette wheel that throws the ball, I mean how cool is that man? I mean, I don't care what you're gonna think about it or if it looks tacky on the wrist. Man, just imagine being able to have them just in a watch winder, just to play with them. I think it's just pretty cool and it's a work of art.... Follow us on social media using the links below: Instagram https://www.instagram.com/crmjewelers/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/crmjewelers Google + https://plus.google.com/+Crmjewelers/ Steemit https://steemit.com/@crmjewelers Take a Selfie with our Cuban Link App https://www.crmjewelers.com/cuban-link-app/ Join Our VIP Club and Save! https://www.crmjewelers.com/vip/
Views: 6174 CRM Jewelers
What do the Porsche brand, logo and model names mean?
 
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In this video we go through the etymology of the Porsche brand, and all of its most famous models (718, 911, Cayenne, Macan, Panamera, Boxster and Cayman).
Views: 660 betweentheaxles
What is VISUAL BRAND LANGUAGE? What does VISUAL BRAND LANGUAGE mean? VISUAL BRAND LANGUAGE meaning
 
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What is VISUAL BRAND LANGUAGE? What does VISUAL BRAND LANGUAGE mean? VISUAL BRAND LANGUAGE meaning - VISUAL BRAND LANGUAGE definition - VISUAL BRAND LANGUAGE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Visual brand language is the unique "alphabet" of design elements – such as shape, color, materials, finish, typography and composition – which directly and subliminally communicate a company's values and personality through compelling imagery and design style. This "alphabet", properly designed, results in an emotional connection between the brand and the consumer. Visual brand language is a key ingredient necessary to make an authentic and convincing brand strategy that can be applied uniquely and creatively in all forms of brand communications to both employees and customers. Successful Visual Brand Language creates a memorable experience for the consumer, encouraging repeat business and boosting the company's economic health. It is a long-term creative solution that can be leveraged by an executive team to showcase their brand's unique personality. For example, as shown, a Starbucks constant, main design ingredient was black and white icons. The icons represent elements of the "alphabet". Each year, the promotional campaigns would use the same icons but the color palette and the featured icons would change. Another distinguishing iconic design element is the BMW 'split grill' continually employed to represent the brand. While the grill size and design details evolve over time, the underlying idea is constant and memorable. The use of color is also a powerful associative element for consistent imagery, as exemplified by the comprehensive application of orange by The Home Depot across all its brand materials. The strategic pyramid is a four-staged hierarchal pyramid that serves as a guideline to establish or re-establish the visual brand language of a business. With the market being flooded with new products, services, and ideas each day, it is vital for businesses to stand out from the crowd. Every brand has a fundamental need to connect with their target market and audience. This pyramid serves as a reference system for designers and other individuals within the company to better understand and create the brand personality, product attributes, design principles, and signature elements of the brand design. Starbucks Coffee will be used as an example to help better illustrate this pyramid. Brand personality is understood as the human characteristics or traits that can be attributed to a brand. This is also known as brand identity. In 21st century business, it is important for a business to distinguish itself from its competitors through Emotional branding. By establishing a brand personality, businesses can form emotional bonds with their consumers which in turn establishes future behaviours of Brand loyalty. Brands have the ability "to fill a void, to take root, and to flourish." For example, from the very beginning, the brand mantra of Starbucks Coffee was to create a "rich, rewarding coffee experience." Starbucks demonstrates a "persona" that goes far beyond their functional benefits. By establishing desired traits of a brand, businesses can then take the next step of building strategies to successfully communicate their brand personality to consumers. Product attributes are meant to highlight and describe the uniqueness of a brand. This can be achieved through a variety of ways, however it must build upon an established brand personality as previously mentioned. Product attributes are the traits that distinguish a brand against its competitors. Starbucks has successfully established its brand personality through its customers who have described Starbucks synonymous to, "comfort, quality, and community." Starbucks coffee has achieved the attributes of their brand by understanding that their coffee was not the only key driver to their success. They focused on creating a comfortable atmosphere within the store known as the "Starbucks Experience," where both employee and customer come in for more than just coffee. Product attributes are meant to "deliver new ideas to existing products and services."
Views: 233 The Audiopedia
Brand Matters: What does it mean for a brand to be human?
 
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In this episode of Brand Matters, we speak to Liana Dinghile, group strategy director, EMEA, about why it is so important for brands to embrace humanity, and how it helps them connect all the more. For more insights that inspire, check out our blog: http://www.siegelgale.com/views Siegel+Gale is a global strategic branding firm based in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, London, Dubai, and Beijing: http://www.siegelgale.com
Views: 3145 Siegel Gale
What is NATIONAL BRAND? What does NATIONAL BRAND mean? NATIONAL BRAND meaning & explanation
 
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What is NATIONAL BRAND? What does NATIONAL BRAND mean? NATIONAL BRAND meaning - NATIONAL BRAND definition - NATIONAL BRAND explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ The brand name of a product that is distributed nationally under a brand name owned by the producer or distributor, as opposed to local brands (products distributed only in some areas of the country), and private label brands (products that carry the brand of the retailer rather than the producer.) National brands must compete with local and private brands. National brands are produced by, widely distributed by, and carry the name of the manufacturer. Local brands may appeal to those consumers who favor small, local producers over large national or global producers, and may be willing to pay a premium to "buy local". The private label producer can offer lower prices because they avoid the cost of marketing and advertising to create and protect the brand. In North America, large retailers such as Loblaws, Walgreens and Wal-Mart all offer private label products. On the other hand, marketing and advertising may give consumers the impression that the national brand is superior to a local- or private-branded product.
Views: 358 The Audiopedia
What does the brand XIAOMI mean?
 
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Xiaomi Corporation is a Chinese electronics company headquartered in Beijing. #Xiaomi makes and invests in smartphones, mobile apps, laptops, and related consumer electronics. It is the largest smartphone company in China and world's 4th largest smartphone manufacturer. But do you know the meaning of the word Xiaomi? The literal English meaning of the word Xiaomi is Millet. The company was set to build an AOSP (Android Open Source Project) system called MIUI. So in short, they named the company with XiaoMI. Xiao means little, young or small in Chinese. It makes people think about some cute, wonderful things, young people which are major composite of the MIUI fan group and the companies' target users group. Hence, they combined Xiao and MI together and the combination become a new word in Chinese which means Millet in English. Music provided by Frequency. Track: Fluex - Wings To Fly Link: https://youtu.be/qKLRv7vL7Rk
Views: 2038 Sokumo Facts
What is ASPIRATIONAL BRAND? What does ASPIRATIONAL BRAND mean? ASPIRATIONAL BRAND meaning
 
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What is ASPIRATIONAL BRAND? What does ASPIRATIONAL BRAND mean? ASPIRATIONAL BRAND meaning - ASPIRATIONAL BRAND definition - ASPIRATIONAL BRAND explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In consumer marketing, an aspirational brand (or product) means a large segment of its exposure audience wishes to own it, but for economic reasons cannot. An aspirational product implies certain positive characteristics to the user, but the supply appears limited due to limited production quantities. An important characteristic of an aspirational product is that the part of its exposure audience that is at present economically unable to purchase it, thinks of itself as having a fair probability of at a certain point in the future being able to do so. This part of the exposure audience is referred to as the aspirational audience, whereas the part of the exposure audience that already can afford the product is called the consumption audience. Consumption audience and aspirational audience together form the aspirational product's target audience, which typically represents 30%-60% of the exposure audience Weak aspirational brands have target audiences that are almost as large as their exposure audiences (e.g. mp3 player brands), and are therefore slowly becoming commodity brands, e.g. brands with consumption audiences that coincide with the exposure audience (and therefore, brands without an aspiring audience). As a general rule, an aspirational brand and its products can command a price premium in the marketplace over a commodity brand. This ability can to a large extent be explained by the consumer's need for invidious consumption for which he is willing to pay a premium. The smaller the size of the product's target audience compared to the exposure audience, the more the product satisfies this need, and the higher the premium that such a consumer is prepared to pay. The larger the ratio of aspirational to consumption consumers in the target audience, the higher the brand's premium, e.g. Maybach cars. To keep the premium level of a brand high, the consumption portion of the audience should not exceed 30% of the aspirational audience.
Views: 537 The Audiopedia
Brand Building — Use This Rebranding Tool Secret
 
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Please watch today's brand new episode of One Minute Wednesday: "" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJjKA6Jy6gI --~-- #brandbuilding #branding One Minute Wednesdays is the weekly video series that covers branding, rebranding, marketing, leadership and brand strategies for entrepreneurs around the world. This Episode 38 of One Minute Wednesday covers Brand Building, Initiating a Movement, and Starting a Revolution. Each is those is AN ACT OF DEFIANCE which I discuss on https://www.risingabovethenoise.com/7-defiant-steps-for-true-brand-building/ Realize each of these is a definite cousin of the same gene pool. — As an award-winning veteran (recipient of over 330 international industry recognitions) in branding, rebrands, design and brand strategy, I have designed and transformed global brands, regional and local brands, and brands for startups and even cities. 📙 Brand Intervention Book (please review) http://a.co/d/dr1RLvS 📌Rising Above The Noise https://www.RisingAboveTheNoise.com 📌The #1 article on Google for How to Rebrand: https://www.risingabovethenoise.com/how-to-rebrand-19-questions-ask-before-you-start/ @DavidBrier (Twitter/IG) Subscribe to our YouTube channel (turn on notifications): https://www.youtube.com/user/headmusik Want the best book written on branding and rebranding covering Strategy, Sales & Marketing, Social Media and The Business of Branding with a Foreword by Shark Tank's Daymond John: https://www.brandinterventionbook.com/buy-brand-intervention — Visit our website: https://www.RisingAboveTheNoise.com FREE eBook on Branding: https://www.risingabovethenoise.com/download/the-lucky-brand-ebook-from-david-brier/ — Alexa Skill #1 for Branding and Rebranding: 🎙 https://amzn.to/2ydjuM0
Views: 265 David Brier
Branding and The Attack on the Consumer
 
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Please watch today's brand new episode of One Minute Wednesday: "" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJjKA6Jy6gI --~-- http://www.risingabovethenoise.com Posted by brand identity specialist, David Brier. Filmed in Defy-O-Vision, this is the 2nd in our branding series on consumers and their needs. Customers are the lifeblood of any and every business, from Trump to Apple and everything in between. This answers the question, "Who wants to be a millionaire?" and what this means to your business. entrepreneurship graphics how to brand vlog graphic design
Views: 679 David Brier
Spotting the Biggest Lie in Branding in 60 Seconds (Entrepreneurship Marketing Tip)
 
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Please watch today's brand new episode of One Minute Wednesday: "" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJjKA6Jy6gI --~-- EPISODE 2 OF ONE MINUTE WEDNESDAYS WITH DAVID BRIER: The 3 Words That Kill Any Brand (and Its Chance of Success) in 60 Seconds For more information, http://www.RisingAboveTheNoise.com This video shares a key insight from the Amazon bestseller, Brand Intervention: 33 Steps to Transform the Brand You Have into the Brand You Need. Grab your copy here: http://a.co/ejDmCzK Spotting the Biggest Lie in Branding in 60 Seconds: Our culture has been infected by a disease. It’s called “Entitle-tosis” and it’s spreading at an alarming rate. One primary symptom is the attitude, “I showed up.” Entitled to Success? No. FACT: No one is entitled to anything. It’s like this: people and brands that hustle intelligently win. Those that don’t fail. Nobody deserves to starve.  No talent deserves being overlooked.  No ingenuity deserves being ignored and suffering failure.  No entrepreneurial effort deserves the embarrassment of defeat. Yet, failed brands that simply show up (with a bad case of “Entitle-tosis” in their mindset) find that they failed to hustle enough first. In part because they don’t see the opportunities nor the barriers that stare them in the face very day, every hour. It's like my buddy Daymond John says, We each have 24 hours in a day, yet the difference between what we each achieve covers the spectrum. So what are you going to do that's different? Success comes with a price: paying attention, before, during, and after any event. Those that that do fail don’t hustle as much, shift as fast, or observe as clearly as those that “somehow make it.” The video (Episode 1) explains it, all in about a minute. Welcome to One-Minute Wednesdays. The biggest Lie in Marketing | The biggest Lie in Branding | Branding | Branding yourself | Leadership | Branding failures | Branding mistakes | Branding your business | Crushing it | Inspiration | Branding yourself on social media | Branding Hacks | Brand mistakes | Brand failures | valuetainment | entrepreneurship | gary vaynerchuk inspired this
Views: 639 David Brier
What is BRAND PIRACY? What does BRAND PIRACY mean? BRAND PIRACY meaning, definition & explanation
 
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What is BRAND PIRACY? What does BRAND PIRACY mean? BRAND PIRACY meaning - BRAND PIRACY definition - BRAND PIRACY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Brand piracy is the act of naming a product in a manner which can result in confusion with other better known brands. According to author Robert Tönnis The term brand piracy is unauthorized usage of protected brand names, labels, designs or description of trade. Annika Kristin states "brand Piracy is considered to be the premeditated use of registered trademark, its name, its tradename or the packaging and presentation of its products". It is a major loss to MNE's around the world as it causes a loss of revenue and image of the brand. Tönnis describes the consequence of brand piracy as the consumption of fake, untested and poor quality goods by consumers. This can damage the reputation of brands and even result in damage to people's health. In 2012 the CBP promised to protect the economy, the people of the USA and their national security "against harm from counterfeit and pirated goods". Examples for imitation and counterfeiting of branded products have been noted as early as 1912. Louis Vuitton have had to fight for their brand image after consumers (mistakenly) lost interest in them due to the availability of cheap counterfeits. Forged Rolex watches can be purchased for a fraction of the original's price in many places of the world. In Mexico Cartier have had to fight the piracy of their own brand. Benetton, Levi Strauss & Co. and Lacoste have all been victims of counterfeiting in which the label has been altered of an obviously inferior product. Examples of Coalgate (as against Colgate), Del Mundo (instead of Del Monte), as well as knockoff Sharpie markers branded under fake names such as "Sharpei", "Sherpie", "Shoupie", or "Skerple" all fall into the category of piracy where the product is different but the trademark looks the same. The music industry claims that brand piracy causes a loss of USD 4.6 Billion in market share alone. It also states that 7 out of 10 CD's sold around the world are pirated. While some experts suggest the company to go the extremes of punishing the counterfeiter, others also suggest takeover or franchisee agreements with them. Some other authors suggest web based web crawlers that can identify and delete any promotional material that infringes with the product of the company. Some authors suggest recourse to legal action and a study of legal protections available in those markets where Piracy is prevalent. Since 1977 obvious plagiarism in regards to established design is also exposed in public by awarding the negative prize Plagiarius.
Views: 202 The Audiopedia
The Business Model Canvas - 9 Steps to Creating a Successful Business Model - Startup Tips
 
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The Business Model Canvas - 9 Steps to Creating a Successful Business Model - Startup Tips The Business Model Canvas, is a strategic management and entrepreneurial tool. It allows you to describe, design, challenge, invent, and pivot your business model. The Business Model Canvas is comprised of 9 key segments: The left hand section of the Business Model Canvas is the Infrastructure section and comprises three key areas: Key Activities: The most important activities in executing a company's value proposition. Key Resources: The resources that are necessary to create value for the customer. Partner Network: In order to optimize operations and reduce risks of a business model, organization usually cultivate buyer-supplier relationships so they can focus on their core activity. The middle section of the canvas describes the business offering and is the value proposition delivered to different customer segments. Value Propositions: The collection of products and services a business offers to meet the needs of its customers. According to Osterwalder, (2004), a company's value proposition is what distinguishes itself from its competitors. The value proposition provides value through various elements such as newness, performance, customization, "getting the job done", design, brand/status, price, cost reduction, risk reduction, accessibility, and convenience/usability. The value propositions may be: Quantitative – price and efficiency Qualitative – overall customer experience and outcome The right hand side of the Business Model Canvas describes the customers, the channels through which you deliver services and and the relationships you have with your customers. Customer Segments: To build an effective business model, a company must identify which customers it tries to serve. Various sets of customers can be segmented based on the different needs and attributes to ensure appropriate implementation of corporate strategy meets the characteristics of selected group of clients. Channels: A company can deliver its value proposition to its targeted customers through different channels. Effective channels will distribute a company’s value proposition in ways that are fast, efficient and cost effective. An organization can reach its clients either through its own channels (store front), partner channels (major distributors), or a combination of both. Customer Relationships: To ensure the survival and success of any businesses, companies must identify the type of relationship they want to create with their customer segments. The bottom section of the canvas describes the finances. Cost Structure: This describes the most important monetary consequences while operating under different business models. A company's DOC. Revenue Streams: The way a company makes income from each customer segment. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIypuA7lS-FsVG6cMlNCK2w?sub_confirmation=1 Check out some of our other videos Compensation claims - how long should it take https://youtu.be/NuxfrgSTg78 LLC vs S Corp https://youtu.be/4xNCnf9hitw Minizing tax https://youtu.be/ybSnFb6rx6Y How to fund a startup https://youtu.be/ctzDb59sw5M Kickstarter success Ep 1 https://youtu.be/2EG78JNZ7nA Kickstarter success Ep 2 https://youtu.be/ZMlq5CmUNz8 How to pitch to investors with Guy Kawasaki https://youtu.be/-epR-uGlv4M If you are interested in sustainability issues then check this video out The Sustainable Business Model Canvas https://youtu.be/gVimMEI2u2w
Views: 716880 The Business Channel
What does the KenWeal Clothing Brand logo mean?
 
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KenWeal® is a registered trademark. In this video clip, the Founder and CEO of KenWeal® - Kenneth Weal is sharing the meaning of his company logo. Read HISTORY on: http://www.KenWeal.com The meaning of Kenneth Weal's KenWeal® company logo is: The crown on the eagles’ head represents: That Kenneth Weal is the king of his sickness – He doesn’t allow the illness to run his life. The letters KW on the crown represents: His initials/KenWeal. The 6 diamonds on the KenWeal crown represents the age (16) when he was diagnosed with systemic lupus with kidney disease. The eagle represents: Strength to soar and Kenneth Weal sees himself soaring as a child of God. The look on the eagles’ face represents: Determination – He’s very focused on achieving greatness. KenWeal name: He separated his first name and used his last name. Video: 'One On One With Kenneth Weal' http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ppAUnxr99lY
Views: 355 KenWeal

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